How to start a matching gift program [for companies]

How to Start a Matching Gift Program [For Companies]

Thousands of companies host matching gift programs that encourage and amplify employee giving to nonprofit causes. When an individual works for such a company, they are able to make a donation to their favorite charitable organization and request a corporate match as well. This stretches the impact of their initial gift further, allowing them to make a more significant difference with their dollars.

While these types of programs are continuing to grow in popularity among companies and their employees alike, unfortunately, not all businesses offer gift-matching. But it’s not too late to get started!

If you’re a corporate leader looking to find out how to start a matching gift program for your company, you’ve come to the right place. In this step-by-step guide, we’ll walk through the key actions that, when done right, will enable you to develop an effective matching program for your business. These steps include:

  1. Setting a budget and goals for your donation-matching program.
  2. Identifying matching gift threshold criteria.
  3. Determining eligibility for your matching gift programs.
  4. Deciding how your company will facilitate matching.
  5. Establishing your matching gift request process (and deadline).
  6. Crafting an employee-facing matching gift policy document.
  7. Informing employees about your matching gift initiative.
  8. Ensuring your matching gift program is added to the top matching database.
  9. Collecting data, tracking impact, and making program improvements.

Companies match gifts for a wide range of reasons. These typically encompass business-related benefits such as increased employee engagement, improved reputation, tax deductions, and more⁠. In fact, employees and consumers alike are now more than ever demanding corporate social responsibility from the brands they support.

Studies show that more than 77% of employees reported a sense of purpose as a part of the reason they selected their current employer, while 2/3 of young employees won’t take a job at a company with poor CSR practices, and 55% of employees would even take a pay cut to work for a socially responsible company. At the same time, 90% of consumers worldwide are likely to switch to brands supporting good causes, while 66% would pay more to CSR-focused businesses.

Reasons why companies should start matching gift programs

However, genuine altruism can be another key driver behind matching gifts and other workplace and corporate philanthropy programs. Corporate leaders know they have the opportunity to make a real difference in the world and utilize their businesses to do so. And launching a matching gift program is a particularly impactful way to go.

Let’s dive in with the first step.

1. Set a budget and goals for your donation-matching program.

Before you can (or should) launch any new corporate initiative, it’s important to begin with your budget and goals. The same is true for matching gifts. These two criteria will guide the rest of your efforts⁠—your budget because it allows you to determine your new program’s limits and goals to help prioritize objectives and establish what success looks like.

When it comes to budget, we recommend setting a figure that is on the higher end of realistic for your business. That is because, although not every employee will choose to partake, you want to be sure you have the funding should you end up with higher participation rates than you’d initially expected.

You’ll also need to determine where this money will come from. Keep in mind that, though some companies reallocate funding for their matching gift programs from an existing philanthropic budget, others opt to establish a match reserve that is above and beyond any prior giving.

Now, for your goals; two of the most common types of objectives that a company might set in terms of matching gift program success have to do with dollars donated or employee participation. For example, you may decide that your goal for the first twelve months of your program is to contribute $X thousand dollars through employee matching gifts. On the other hand, perhaps you set a primary objective to incite X% staff participation in your matching gift program’s foundational year.

For additional context, take a look at the participation rates from several top matching gift companies in the financial, technology, consumer goods, and pharmaceutical industries:

How to start a matching gift program and set participation goals with context from top companies

Regardless, either objective structure works; it’s just a matter of ensuring your team is on the same page.

2. Identify matching gift threshold criteria.

Once you have your budget and goals set, it’s time to establish the boundaries of your program. Essentially, this criteria determines the total amount of funding that is available to each employee on an annual basis and should include the following details:

  • Ratios ⁠— Your matching gift ratio is the rate at which you agree to match employee donations. 1:1 is by far the most common match rate, with 91% of companies match donations doing so at a 1:1 ratio. However, some companies (approximately 4%) choose to match at a lower rate, such as .5:1, while others (5%) match at a higher rate, such as 2, 3, or even 4:1. For context, if an employee were to make a $100 donation, a 1:1 match would involve a $100 corporate gift, while a .5:1 match would result in a $50 match, and a 2:1 ratio would produce a $200 match.
  • Minimum amounts ⁠— Next is the minimum amount that your company agrees to match. Minimums are typically set in order to ensure employees are requesting corporate funds for the organizations they truly care about and support with their own dollars. Overall, 93% of companies with matching gift programs have a minimum match requirement of less than or equal to $50, with the average falling at $34. However, minimums can be as low as $1, and some companies choose not to set minimum gift amounts in the first place.
  • Maximum amounts ⁠— On the other end of the spectrum, nearly all companies set maximum match amounts that they’re willing to pay. Maximum caps allow corporations to manage their budgets properly and ensure there is funding available for any eligible employee to participate. Our research shows that 80% of companies’ matching gift maximums fall between $500 and $10,000 annually per employee, the mean amount coming in at $3,728.

Some businesses even vary their guidelines depending on an individual’s employment status or job type. For example, executive-level team members may be eligible for a 2:1 match up to $20,000, while all other employees receive a 1:1 match up to $10,000. In the same vein, you may decide that part-time and retired employees can request a particular amount of match funding, while current full-time staff are eligible for a higher level.

3. Determine eligibility for your matching gift programs.

Beyond monetary amounts, many companies also set specific eligibility criteria regarding the employee types that qualify to request matches, nonprofit mission types that qualify to receive matches, and contribution types that qualify as initial donations. Let’s take a look at each in further detail as you decide which kinds of gifts your company is willing to match:

  • Employee participants ⁠— Most matching gift programs are divided into eligibility status based on employment with the company offering the program. Typically, any combination of current, full-time, current part-time, and retired employees will qualify to get involved. However, some companies take things a step further by offering program eligibility to spouses and other family members of current and former staff members as well.
  • Nonprofit recipients ⁠— Though many companies will match gifts to any nonprofit organizations, others will choose specific mission types to either focus on or exclude from the matching initiative. For example, churches and other strictly religious organizations are some of the most common exclusions from companies’ matching programs. On the other hand, some companies will choose a specific cause type (often educational institutions) to which they will exclusively direct matching gift funds. Overall, companies typically choose from organizations in categories such as higher educational institutions, K-12 schools, health and human services, arts and cultural organizations, civic and community organizations, environmental organizations, and more.
  • Donation types ⁠— By this point, you should have already determined the amounts you’re willing to match per employee in a pre-determined period. Now comes the question of which types of donations are eligible for corporate matching. Nonprofit donations can be made through a wide range of channels, including (but not limited to) an organization’s website, online donation tools, peer-to-peer giving campaigns, text giving, direct mail, recurring donations, phonathons, paycheck deductions, event pledges, stock donations and other gifts of securities, and more.

In order to ensure an optimal employee giving experience, experts recommend providing a large number of choices for employees to give⁠ and to get their gifts matched⁠. Similarly, your company will likely see significantly increased participation levels should you open the program to as many employees and nonprofits as possible.

4. Decide how your company will facilitate matching.

Even after launching your matching gift offering, maintaining an effective program will require some continuous upkeep from company leadership. However, you don’t have to do it all manually if you choose not to.

There are generally two key management methods you can choose from:

  • In-house program management ⁠— Many companies⁠—particularly small businesses⁠—start by matching gifts on their own. While this can keep program overhead costs low, it will require additional investments of time and effort from corporate management. After employees submit their matching gift requests, there must be a process in place to facilitate the review of employee submissions, verify initial donations meet matching criteria, approve corporate matches, and disburse match funding.
  • Outsourcing to third-party solution ⁠— The alternative to in-house management is outsourcing aspects of your matching gift program to a third-party solution. Though this path will typically involve paying fees to various software vendors, it ultimately saves your team time, effort, and resources. Working with a matching gift software vendor (we have reviews of several top providers for businesses of all shapes and sizes here) allows your company to take a more hands-off approach to matching gifts while streamlining the processes involved for employee participants.

Either practice works, and many companies find that they begin with an in-house management style but later upgrade with corporate giving technology to elevate their efforts. As you make your decision, keep in mind that CSR is an investment that tends to bring substantial benefits to your business as a whole.

5. Establish your matching gift request process (and deadline).

In order to participate in your newly developed matching gift program, employees need to know how to participate and how long they have after making their initial nonprofit donations to complete the request process. Regarding the latter, most companies set their program participation deadlines according to one of the following schedule approaches:

  • Number of months following an initial donation ⁠— Most commonly six or twelve months following the date of an employee’s initial donation, this type of matching gift deadline works on a rolling basis. If an employee donated to a nonprofit on a certain day one year, they might qualify to request their match until the same date the following year. Or, they might remain eligible for six, nine, or even eighteen months after their original gift, depending on the company offering the program.
  • End of the calendar year ⁠— For companies that utilize the calendar year to organize their matching gift programs, it’s simple to determine when a match request is due. Whichever year the initial donation was made, the match must be submitted by December 31st of the same year. This is true regardless of whether the gift was contributed on January 1st or December 1st. However, this can result in employees who give later in the year having significantly less time to submit their matches.
  • End of the calendar year + grace period ⁠— Similar to the previous type, some companies choose to enact a matching gift deadline based on the end of the calendar year and then add on a grace period. The grace period is typically a few additional months into the next year. This means that an individual’s match request would typically be due by February, March, or April following the year in which the initial donation was made.
  • End of the fiscal year ⁠— If your company operates on a schedule other than the calendar year, it might make sense for your team to set your matching gift deadline in relation to the end of that year instead. Drawbacks to this method may occur if employees are not aware of the fiscal year the company runs on, so be sure to proactively communicate your deadline to employees if so.

Other common stipulations include that the employee must be gainfully employed by the company at both the time the donation is made and the time the match request is submitted and paid out.

As you craft your submission deadlines, you’ll also want to determine which information you’ll request from employees looking to submit their match requests. Common requirements include the employee’s name, organization name, mailing address, and tax ID number, and donation amount and type. You may also ask for a copy of the individual’s donation receipt, and some companies choose to verify each donation with the organization itself (though that can be a hassle for all parties involved).

You’ll also need to establish and ultimately communicate the way in which employees will go about requesting their matches. If you choose to manage your program with a matching gift software vendor, be sure to direct team members to the company’s online match request portal. If you end up facilitating your program in-house, ensure individuals know how to complete the submission process and have the resources they need to do so.

6. Craft an employee-facing matching gift policy document.

Some of the biggest reasons employees fail to participate in their companies’ matching gift programs, even if they make qualifying donations, is that they are unaware of their eligibility or lack understanding of the match request process and, subsequently, end up missing the deadline. Therefore, it’s essential that you take steps to communicate your program’s guidelines and instructions for participation to eligible employees.

One of the easiest and most effective ways to do so is by producing employee-facing documentation with all the information your staff will need to get involved. This should include your company’s match criteria, such as:

  • Match ratio
  • Minimum and maximum donation amounts
  • Qualifying employees and nonprofit causes
  • Types of donations and submission deadlines
  • Matching gift request process and links to online forms

Once you have all the information in one place, it’s easy for employees to determine whether their most recent donations are eligible for matching and take the initiative to participate. Keep in mind that, as you make adjustments to your matching gift program, it’s important to ensure your policy documentation is as accurate and up to date as possible.

7. Inform employees about your matching gift initiative.

Once your program is live, it’s time to begin promoting the opportunity to your employees. This is an essential, though often overlooked, step in the process. In fact, our research shows that despite 26 million individuals working for companies that match gifts, more than 78% of the group has never been made aware of the programs.

Unfortunately, many of those individuals never go to request corporate matches regardless of their eligibility to participate. In the end, that means companies are not reaping the maximum benefit of the programs they worked to establish.

Thus, in order to make the most of your business’ match initiative, it’s imperative that you take the time to ensure your workforce is aware. What this looks like specifically can vary from company to company.

You might:

  • Send out a team-wide email;
  • Announce the inception of your program at a meeting;
  • Add a section to your office policy handbook;
  • Incorporate matching gifts in your onboarding process going forward;

Or even all of the above.

The bottom line is that your employees should know about the program and be reminded of the opportunity multiple times throughout the year.

8. Ensure your matching gift program is added to the top matching database.

Directly informing your staff about your newly developed matching gift program is critical. Now your team should be aware of the initiative and ready to get involved. But you also want to ensure that employees are reminded of the program opportunities directly after making eligible nonprofit donations⁠—ideally from the organizations themselves.

For that to occur, you’ll need to first confirm that your matching gift program is added to the leading database of corporate matching gift program information: Double the Donation. Once added, employees will be able to search your company and receive program-specific details straight from the organizations they support, often within a donation confirmation screen widget or follow-up email.

Add your company to Double the Donation's database after starting your company's matching gift program

From there, employees can navigate to your company’s matching gift request forms online and complete their submission while leveraging their post-donation momentum. It simplifies the process involved for team members and results in significantly more matches being completed⁠—meaning more nonprofits receiving funding and increased benefits for your company.

To add your company, follow this link and provide the information requested. This includes your company name, submission materials (such as links to online forms, PDF uploads), and eligibility criteria.

(Hint: the more information you share, the easier it will be for employees to participate in your program.)

9. Collect data, track impact, and make program improvements.

This last stage of the matching gift development process involves taking a look at the program you’ve created and determining whether it meets the criteria previously set in place during step #1. You should be collecting and analyzing data throughout the process (made particularly simple when utilizing program management software). Now, this data comes in handy to help determine program success.

For example, did you meet or exceed your goals? If so⁠—what happens now? Will you set loftier goals for the future and continue matching? If not, how will you adjust your program strategy to ensure your team is on track to reach your goals this time around?

You can also take a closer look at your company’s data to determine and communicate program impact. This should answer questions like how many and to which nonprofits did your company give? What amounts were donated through both employee gifts and corporate matches?

Finally, you’ll want to explore ways to continuously improve your matching gift program in the months and years to come. Consider ways to drive employee engagement in your programming. Elevate giving by increasing your match ratio or maximum donation cap. As your company grows, your matching gift initiative should grow alongside it.


It doesn’t have to be difficult to get started with matching gifts, and your company’s programming doesn’t have to be the most built-out initiative before you can make it available to employees. Everyone has to begin somewhere, and following the nine steps above will allow you to build a solid foundation for your workforce.

Good luck, and happy matching!

Interested in learning more about matching gifts and developing optimized employee giving initiatives? Check out these other educational resources for companies here:

Find out how to start a matching gift program and drive corporate philanthropy at your company!

Matching gift guidelines overview

Matching Gift Guidelines | Ratios, Minimums, Maximums & More

Thousands of companies match donations made by employees to a range of nonprofit causes through corporate matching gift programs. However, billions of dollars in available corporate matching revenue go unclaimed each year⁠—largely due to a lack of awareness surrounding the programs and the matching gift guidelines and request process that are required for donors to participate.

A general understanding of corporate giving is a great foundation for maximizing nonprofit revenue. However, in order to succeed in acquiring matching gifts, you’ll need to understand the nitty-gritty elements of program stipulations.

For example, companies are able to decide their specific guidelines for matching gift participation based typically on employee eligibility, nonprofit eligibility, and submission deadlines. From there, the amount that a company will match (per employee per year) is based on a combination of matching gift ratios, minimums, and maximum match amounts.

In this post, we’ll break down the key components of basic matching gift guidelines:

  1. Match Ratios
  2. Minimum Match Amounts
  3. Maximum Match Amounts
  4. Employee Eligibility
  5. Nonprofit Eligibility
  6. Forms and Deadlines

Not to mention, we’ll also provide an overview of the most effective method for determining program eligibility through companies’ matching gift guidelines. Equipped with the right tools, you can easily identify matching gift opportunities and communicate eligibility criteria and next steps to guide donors through the request process.

The match ratio is an important component of corporate matching gift programs.

1. Match Ratios

Companies determine how much to match employee donations based on a preset ratio. In most cases, companies choose to match donations at a dollar-for-dollar rate (otherwise known as a 1:1 ratio).

When a program offers a 1:1 ratio, an employee will donate to an eligible nonprofit, submit their matching gift request to their employer, and then their company will match that gift with the same amount.

For instance, if an employee donates $100 to a nonprofit that’s eligible for the company’s match program, the employer will donate an additional $100. In the end, the nonprofit receives a $200 donation, which is double the original contribution.

Although you can expect to see a lot of 1:1 matching programs, ratios can range from .5:1 (or a $50 corporate donation for a $100 employee gift) all the way up to 4:1 (which would be a $400 company gift in response to a $100 employee contribution). Either way, the nonprofit receiving match funding results in significantly increased amounts flowing to the organization.

Let’s take a look at matching gift ratios in action. Consider these companies, for example:

  • Puget Sound Energy matches employee donations at a .5:1 rate.
  • Apple matches employee donations at a 1:1 rate.
  • Coca-Cola matches employee donations at a 2:1 rate.

Another thing to keep in mind when it comes to matching gift rates is an individual’s employment type. While ratios are typically standardized across all employee types, some companies will vary amounts depending on an employee’s position or type of employment.

For example, part-time employees, retirees, and even team member spouses may have a lower match rate than corporate executives who work for the same company. Take the following companies as an example:

  • Soros Fund Management matches donations from partners at a 1:1 rate and employees at a 2:1 rate.
  • Johnson & Johnson matches donations from current employees at a 2:1 ratio and retirees at a 1:1 ratio.

Takeaway: Matching gift ratios vary from company to company and may change based on employee position. These stipulations are entirely up to the company, and nonprofits and employees should stay up-to-date on their match opportunities.

Minimum match amounts are common elements of corporate matching gift programs.

2. Minimum Match Amounts

Unfortunately, not every company will match every donation made by an employee⁠—even if they do have a matching gift program in place. In order to qualify for a company match, restrictions are often put in place regarding the minimum donation amount they will match.

If a donor’s contribution falls below that set amount, the company will not match the gift. Keep in mind that this isn’t intended to restrict employees’ philanthropic efforts. Rather, it’s to ensure that employees are requesting matches for causes they truly care about.

Nonetheless, corporate matching gift best practices suggest keeping the minimum low to encourage participation and make the programming accessible to employees of all budget sizes. As a result, some companies will match donations that are as little as $1. However, the most common minimum requirement is $25, with 93% of companies having a minimum match requirement of less than or equal to $50, and the mean minimum amount falling at $34.

Let’s take a look at these companies’ matching gift minimums for a few common examples:

Another thing to note is that, depending on the company, an individual who makes multiple smaller donations within a year may be able to consolidate them into a single donation match request⁠—despite falling beneath their employer’s minimum for any particular gift.

Takeaway: Companies apply minimum matches to ensure that the giving budget goes to nonprofits that employees actually care about. Most often, set minimums are $25, but they range from $1 to $100+.
Learn about maximum match amounts, which are an important element of matching gift programs.

3. Maximum Match Amounts

In addition to match minimums, companies also put caps on match amounts to ensure there’s enough in the giving budget for each employee to participate. If an employee donates more than the maximum match amount, still, only the defined maximum will be matched by the company.

Maximum matches have quite the range, too. Often, you’ll come across upper limits of between $1,000 and $5,000, with $3,728 as the average maximum threshold. However, there are plenty of companies with matches that are way above that scope.

Take a look at these companies with matching gift caps across the spectrum:

Regardless, each philanthropic program is generous and has the power to make a major difference in the nonprofit world.

Takeaway: Each company has a different maximum amount it will match. Typically, these are around $1,000 to $15,000, but it’s not uncommon to see caps that are higher or lower than this.

In order to submit a request, employees must be eligible, and the eligibility component is defined by the corporate matching gift program.

4. Employee Eligibility

Often, companies create eligibility requirements for employees that may depend on their position or another factor.

For example, some companies match donations made by any current employee, regardless of full- versus part-time status. Others will match retired individuals’ donations even after they depart from the business. Others still will even match gifts made by an employee’s spouse.

To get a real-world idea of this concept, take a look at these companies:

  • Acuity Brands matches donations from directors and executives only.
  • British Petroleum (BP) matches donations made from current employees, but not retirees.
  • Sherwin-Williams matches donations made from all current employees and retirees.
  • ExxonMobil matches donations made from employees, spouses, surviving spouses, and retirees.

Keep in mind that, as previously mentioned, different positions can sometimes mean different match ratios and maximum match amounts, too. For instance, some companies may allow current employees to donate up to a higher amount than retired employees. Another common case is programs that offer executive employees higher maximums than other employees.

Some companies also choose to further reward employees who go the extra mile. For example, take a look at these programs’ matching gift guidelines:

  • American Express offers a 1:1 match ratio for employee donations. However, if the donor serves on a nonprofit board or volunteers more than 50 hours in a year, the first $1,000 of their donations will be matched at a 2:1 ratio.
  • RealNetworks offers a standard matching gift program, but if an employee works at the company for 5 years, they receive an additional $500 grant for a nonprofit of their choosing.

Takeaway: In most cases, there aren’t too many requirements employees have to meet to be eligible for matching gifts. However, sometimes, companies adjust program criteria based on employees’ positions.Nonprofit eligibility is a vital component of corporate matching gift programs.

5. Nonprofit Eligibility

Just like there are standards employees have to meet to request matching gift funds, there are requirements for the nonprofits looking to receive match funding, as well.

While companies typically match donations to most registered 501(c)(3) nonprofits, some companies place restrictions on the types of organizations that are eligible. If a company deems a nonprofit ineligible, employee donations made to that organization will not be matched.

Like all other components of corporate giving programs, the eligibility requirements for nonprofits differ from company to company. These restrictions are often put in place because companies want to support organizations that align with their own views and values while avoiding controversial causes.

For example, churches and other religious organizations are often excluded from matching gift programs. However, many companies will match to religiously affiliated organizations that serve a secular purpose (such as an associated K-12 school or food pantry), while others will match to houses of worship all the same.

Other companies may choose a particular type of organization to which it will exclusively match donations. For example, some businesses match only to educational organizations, while others offer higher maximums or match ratios for schools and higher ed institutions.

Take a look at these companies’ nonprofit eligibility criteria:

  • Air Products and Chemicals matches donations made to colleges and universities at a 1:1 ratio up to $5,000, arts and cultural organizations at a 2:1 ratio up to $2,000, and environmental and conservation organizations at a 1:1 ratio up to $1,000.
  • ExxonMobil has a maximum match amount of $22,500 for donations made to educational institutions, while it will only match up to $2,000 for donations made to cultural organizations.
  • Verizon will match up to $5,000 per employee per year to schools or $1,000 per employee per year to other 501(c)(3) organizations.

Takeaway: Companies sometimes place restrictions on which organizations can receive matching gifts. It’s up to donors and nonprofits to be on the lookout for these eligibility requirements.

The final major components of corporate matching gift programs are forms and deadlines.

6. Forms and Submission Deadlines

Once all requirements of a company’s matching gift program have been met, this is when submission forms and deadlines come into play.

As a quick refresher, here’s how the typical process works:

The matching gift process is straightforward once all eligibility requirements have been met.

At this point, we’re coming up on the third step in the above procedure. The donor has previously determined that they’re eligible to participate, and now they’re ready to submit their matching gift request.

Though some companies may still utilize paper request forms, most companies are turning to online portals to manage and process employee requests. The bottom line is that there needs to be a way for employees to submit their match requests and the way in which they expect the request to occur should be outlined within the company’s matching gift guidelines.

Regardless of form type, once the donor has navigated to their company’s matching gift forms, they’ll be prompted to provide basic information for the submission. This typically involves details about themself, the specific gift they made (including donation amount, currency, date of transaction, etc.), and the nonprofit that received the donation (such as the organization name, mailing address, and tax ID number).

In addition to the forms themselves, companies also have to define a specific deadline by which the forms must be submitted. For instance, an employee generally can’t donate to a nonprofit and submit a match request two years later.

Instead, in their guidelines, companies might select a specific annually occurring deadline, accept requests for a specific time period (such as six months or one year) after the individual donation was made, fall in line with the end of the calendar year in which the donation was made, or offer a brief extension beyond the calendar year.

To view a few common types, here are request deadlines for several major companies:

  • CarMax accepts matching gift requests within 180 days from the date of the donation.
  • Microsoft accepts matching gift requests for donations up to 12 months later.
  • Boeing accepts matching gift requests from employees until January 31 of the following year after the donation.

Takeaway: Businesses must create accessible forms and define deadlines before putting a match program in place. Nonprofits and their donors need to be aware of these submission instructions and deadlines, otherwise, they may miss out on matching gifts.

Identifying the key guidelines and elements of corporate matching gift programs is easier with a matching gift database.

Matching Gift Database: Identifying Companies’ Guidelines

Nonprofits need to stay up-to-date on companies’ matching gift guidelines, such as donation minimums, maximums, ratios, eligibility, and so on⁠—and that’s a lot of information to manage. Unfortunately, gathering companies’ guidelines on your own can be a mundane and time-consuming process.

With a matching gift database (like Double the Donation), the research is streamlined and simplified for nonprofits and donors alike.

This type of innovative technology ensures that your organization has access to thousands of companies’ matching gift program guidelines at your fingertips. As a result, you can easily determine donors’ match eligibility potential and communicate the opportunities to qualifying donors.

Specifically, a matching gift database enables you and your donors to:

  • Search for 20,000+ companies’ and subsidiaries’ matching gift programs in seconds
  • View and share available information (e.g. forms and requirements) for easy access
  • Determine matching gift eligibility and next steps

Think your nonprofit can benefit from this type of tool?

With 360MatchPro by Double the Donation, organizations like yours can even automate the process. From collecting employment data directly within the donation process to quickly determining eligibility and following up via email, no match opportunities will be overlooked.


Matching gift programs have several guidelines that need to be met in order to qualify for participation, all defined by the companies that offer them. As you’ve learned, the most commonly defined elements are the match ratio, minimum and maximum match amounts, employee and nonprofit eligibility, and submission deadlines.

Take all of these factors into account, and equip your team with the tools you need for success, and you’ll be able to effectively increase the funding source for your organization and its mission. Now, get out there and boost your matching gift potential!

Interested in learning more about matching gifts? Check out these additional resources for more corporate giving tips and tricks:

Identify more matching gift guidelines with Double the Donation.

How to identify corporate sponsorships with 360MatchPro

How to Identify Corporate Sponsorships [With 360MatchPro]

In today’s corporate world, employees and consumers are becoming increasingly focused on supporting socially responsible businesses. Consequently, more and more companies are developing philanthropic programming. And nonprofits looking to raise much-needed funds for their causes are turning to corporate giving as a way to build mutually beneficial business relationships!

As a nonprofit fundraiser yourself, perhaps you’ve recently developed a strategy in order to leverage matching gift opportunities (one of the most prominent forms of corporate philanthropy) for your mission. Maybe you’ve even invested in a matching gift solution to automate the process, better engage with your donors, and collect more individual and corporate funding for your cause.

Now begs the question: what other types of corporate philanthropy are on the table⁠, and how can you begin leveraging these initiatives for your organization?

For many nonprofits, corporate sponsorships are the answer you’re looking for⁠—and 360MatchPro by Double the Donation makes the process as easy as can be.

In this guide, we’ll walk you through everything you need to know about how to identify corporate sponsorships⁠ for nonprofits (and how your team can best pursue the opportunities) by exploring the following topics:

Like matching gifts, corporate sponsorships offer a win-win situation for the nonprofits and businesses that partake. However, many organizations have no idea where to begin when it comes to scouring for partnership opportunities, near and far.

Here, we’ll examine the best tips, tricks, and tools available for doing so (and what you can do with the tools you may already have). Let’s dive in!

The Basics of Corporate Sponsorships for Nonprofits

Corporate sponsorships are a particular form of support nonprofits receive from corporations, often for a specific purpose such as an event or other project.

Learn how to identify corporate sponsorships by learning the basics.

Benefits include not only the increased funding provided by corporate partners but also significantly elevated exposure and awareness brought to your organization through strategic co-marketing efforts.

Corporate sponsorships can come in many forms as well, including:

  • Financial ⁠— This is your most typical type of corporate sponsorship agreement and takes place when a company provides financial support to a nonprofit cause.
  • In-kind ⁠— In-kind sponsorships occur when a company donates non-monetary goods and services to an organization. This may include free or reduced-cost event space rentals, catering services, or even business gift certificates and products for prizes.
  • Media ⁠— Finally, media sponsorships are a unique type of corporate partnership where a company partners with a nonprofit organization in order to take on the cost of promoting the event⁠—such as with radio advertisements, TV commercials, or printed materials.

Then, regardless of the type of sponsorship offered, the nonprofit typically agrees to recognize the company through event or project marketing content (i.e., signage, merchandise, online advertising, and more).

How Matching Gifts and Corporate Sponsorships Work Together

Matching gifts and corporate sponsorships go hand in hand as two particularly powerful forms of corporate giving. Here’s what you need to know:

Matching Gifts

Matching gifts are one of the most popular examples of corporate philanthropy among companies and their employees and nonprofits and their donors. Essentially what occurs with this type of giving program is that businesses agree to provide funding to qualifying nonprofits in order to match charitable donations their employees make to the causes. Thus, individual donors function as arguably the most essential players in the partnership. Companies that offer matching gift programs will typically provide donation matches to a wide range of nonprofit causes that their employees support.

Corporate Sponsorships

On the other hand, corporate sponsorships take place when companies provide funding to nonprofit causes based on particular agreements made between the company and the nonprofit. Though donors and employees can certainly vie for these types of initiatives to occur, any one individual does not typically play a particularly hands-on role in corporate sponsorships being developed. Businesses that participate offer corporate sponsorships for nonprofits typically contribute larger amounts of funding to a smaller number of organizations as compared to employee matching gift programs.

The difference between identifying corporate sponsorships and matching gifts

However, the two concepts do see significant overlap as well. Specifically, both matching gifts and corporate sponsorships function as strategic partnerships between nonprofit organizations and for-profit businesses, and each philanthropic opportunities offer unique and substantial benefits to both parties involved.

3 Ways to Locate Corporate Sponsorship Opportunities Using 360MatchPro

With more than 32.5 million businesses operating in the United States alone, that’s a lot of potential sponsorships for nonprofit organizations. But how can they know where to begin their efforts⁠—and target their outreach toward companies that are the most likely to respond positively to partnership inquiries?

Here are three things fundraising professionals can do to identify top corporate sponsorship opportunities using Double the Donation’s 360MatchPro functionality:

1. Locate top matching gift companies.

Companies that offer matching gift programs are likely to be some of the best prospective corporate sponsors. After all, they already show an interest in philanthropy and supporting nonprofit causes, which can provide you with an existing “in” to the conversation.

If your organization has access to a 360MatchPro account, locating these companies is made even easier. Double the Donation’s automated matching gift platform offers a detailed dashboard that provides invaluable information for nonprofits about their donors. The page includes daily tracking of donations flowing into the system, the amount of identified matching gift dollars, real-time donor engagement statistics, and a list of the “top 10 companies” being looked up in their search tool.

Here's how to identify corporate sponsorships with 360MatchPro dashboard

Specifically, the top companies tool (which can also expand to show all companies contributing donation matches) provides an opportunity for nonprofits to deepen these relationships. With this functionality, users can quickly locate additional context on some of the most valuable companies to approach for corporate sponsorship opportunities and more.

When a user views this data, they can easily navigate to the company’s website and retrieve contact information to get in touch. From there, they can utilize the company’s status as a top matching gift company as a rapport-building tool to get their foot in the door.

For example, a nonprofit may communicate something like this to a business with which they’re interested in partnership:

“Our organization has received 620 donations and $28,000 match identified dollars from your company in the past year. We see that you are dedicated to charitable giving, and it seems that we have a lot in common already! Are you interested in partnering with our team as a corporate sponsor for our upcoming fundraising event?”

This can also set the stage for additional corporate sponsorships such as in-kind donations (e.g., a food bank or homeless shelter working with a business to set up a donation box at the company’s office or store), corporate volunteer opportunities (as team-building activities), and many more.

2. Utilize custom redirects for ineligible donors.

Unfortunately, not all companies offer matching gift programs⁠—but that doesn’t mean you should remove them from your list of potential corporate sponsorships.

In fact, existing donors who work for companies that do not match employee donations can be some of your greatest allies in the process! And Double the Donation makes it as easy as possible to empower these individuals with the tools they need to pitch charitable giving opportunities to their employers with custom redirects and powerful suggested next steps.

Let’s take a look at this idea in action! Here’s an example of a custom redirect from the Denver Rescue Mission:

Here's how one organization identifies corporate sponsorships with a custom redirect.

This organization sends follow-up emails after its donors have been identified as likely ineligible for a matching gift. The message includes a link to a dedicated web page that provides information on other ways the donors can make an impact without existing matching gift programs in place. And that’s something your team can do, too!

We recommend including a number of ways that the receiving donors can get further involved with your nonprofit⁠—even after determining that their gift is not able to be matched by their employer. For example, consider encouraging supporters to take the following next steps:

Make a recommendation for matching gifts.

For companies that don’t have existing matching gift programs, encourage donors to reach out and float the idea upwards. An employee may get in touch with their employer’s HR department to discuss the possibility of launching a matching gift program.

To further simplify the process for your donors, you might even provide a customizable template (such as the one included in this How to Advocate for a Matching Gift Program guide) they can use to pitch matching gifts and highlight the business value available to the company.

And who knows? They might end up developing a matching gift initiative after all!

Look into additional workplace giving opportunities.

Let’s say a donor’s employer doesn’t offer a matching gift program. That’s not to say they don’t have any workplace giving initiatives in place! Encourage donors who work for non-matching gift companies to look into additional corporate giving opportunities they may be eligible to participate in.

Thousands of companies offer volunteer grants, while others may provide annual grant stipends, paid volunteer time off, etc. The possibilities are endless, and all can have a positive impact on your organization.

Multiply their impact in other ways.

Perhaps the donor’s employer is not interested in launching any workplace giving opportunities just yet. That doesn’t mean the donor themselves is not able to amplify their impact on your cause! At this point, be sure to provide recommendations for other ways an individual can get further involved.

For example, if an individual has contributed a one-time donation, see if they’re interested in getting involved in a recurring monthly giving program! Alternatively, you can highlight other ways they can bring value to your cause, such as by volunteering with your organization or even taking on a peer-to-peer fundraising role.

You already know that your donors are invested in your organization and its cause. Having a strategy in place for getting match-eligible donors involved in their employers’ matching gift programs is great. But you don’t want to neglect those who have been identified as match-ineligible, either.

Guiding said donors toward additional opportunities for support is a must. And, if you have 360MatchPro, you don’t have to worry about following up with individual supporters, thanks to your customizable and automated email streams that lead the way.

3. Reach out to companies without matching gift programs.

Sure, your donors can be some of your strongest advocates for corporate partnership opportunities. But you can also reach out to potential sponsors yourself to propose business partnerships and build relationships.

One of the best ways to do so starts with the companies your donors work for that have been determined not to offer matching gift programs. After all, they’re currently missing out on a substantial opportunity for increased business success. Partnering with your organization can empower them to leverage philanthropy to make the most of it.

Consider reaching out to some of the top companies identified through 360MatchPro’s dashboard. From there, you can start with a simple template like this:

Consider reaching out to some of these top companies. You can start with a simple template like this:

“Hi! We see that more than 35 dedicated donors to our nonprofit are employed by your company. Unfortunately, however, it looks like you don’t offer a matching gift program. Because we already have so much in common with us, we were hoping you might be interested in developing a mutually beneficial corporate sponsorship.”

For the best results, be sure to highlight whatever value proposition you can provide your corporate sponsors in terms of your upcoming event or project. Not only will these companies be inclined to build a relationship based on the overlap between your two teams, but they’ll also be able to examine the tangible benefits made available by the partnership.

Depending on how the conversation goes, you might even decide to share with them our detailed guide on How to Start a Matching Gift Program if they’re interested in that opportunity as well.


Increasing revenue through corporate philanthropy is an excellent objective for nonprofits of all shapes, sizes, and missions. And learning how to identify corporate sponsorships is one of the best steps you can take to get there!

For the greatest results, be sure your team is equipped with the tools you need for ongoing, substantial success. For matching gifts and corporate sponsorship opportunities, Double the Donation’s 360MatchPro offers the best-in-class technology to drive matching gifts to completion, uncover potential sponsorships, and more.

Interested in learning more about corporate fundraising? Check out these other educational posts from Double the Donation:

  • Why Workplace Giving Matters for Nonprofits + Companies. Workplace giving programs such as matching gifts and volunteer grants can make a substantial impact on the nonprofits and companies that participate. Learn more about the benefits of workplace giving and how you can utilize the initiatives for your cause.
  • Corporate Giving Programs: The Ultimate Fundraising Guide. Corporate giving programs are not limited to matching gifts and corporate sponsorships! Find out everything there is to know about some of the most popular and effective philanthropy programs offered by companies across the globe with this detailed guide.
  • Matching Gift Databases: Our Comprehensive Guide for 2022. Matching gift software can make a huge difference for matching gift fundraising as well as other forms of corporate giving. Dive into this resource that highlights what to look for in a matching gift database and how it can help your team raise more.

Learn more about identifying corporate sponsorships and increasing matching gifts with Double the Donation.

Nonprofit Stock Donations and Matching Gifts: What to Know

Nonprofit Stock Donations and Matching Gifts | What to Know

Donations of stocks, mutual funds, and other securities are increasing in popularity as a way for individuals to support their favorite causes. After all, these gifts offer exclusive financial benefits both to the donor contributing the gift and the nonprofit receiving it. But what about nonprofit stock donations and matching gifts? Are gifts of securities typically eligible to be matched by donors’ employers?

These are good questions⁠—and they’re cropping up more around nonprofits and donors alike. As a nonprofit fundraising professional, you surely understand the value of corporate matching gifts and are seeking to get as many company matches flowing into your mission as possible.

That’s why we’ve put together this guide that will cover everything your team should know about stock donations and matching gifts by exploring the following topics:

Ready to dive into the world of securities and gift matches? Let’s begin with a brief overview of nonprofit stock donations.

Donating Stock to Nonprofits: FAQ

Just getting started with nonprofit stock donations? These are some frequently asked questions⁠—and answers⁠—on the topic.

The basics of nonprofit stock donations and matching giftsWhat are stock donations?

Stock donations are a unique method of giving in which individual donors can support nonprofit causes by transferring ownership of stock shares from themselves to the organization in question.

Stock donations are also referred to as gifts of securities, which typically encompasses transfers of stocks, bonds, or mutual funds.

In order to secure the full financial benefits of a stock donation, the donor should have held the stock for at least one year from the time of the gift. The organization then has the option to sell the stock immediately upon receiving the donation or allow its shares to continue to appreciate in value.

What are mutual fund donations?

While stock donations typically involve the transfer of shares within a single company, mutual funds can include a portfolio of thousands of stocks, bonds, and other securities compiled as a single entity.

But when it comes to donating assets to charity, mutual fund donations function similarly to stock donations⁠—and similar rules apply regarding mutual fund and stock donations and matching gifts. Most companies that match gifts of stock will also match mutual fund donations and vice versa.

One thing to note, however, is that the mutual fund transfer process can be a bit more complicated than that of single stocks and may require a more hands-on process by the organization receiving the securities.

Why do individuals donate stocks to nonprofit causes?

Nonprofit stock donations are becoming a favorite giving method among donors for multiple reasons. For one, gifts of securities such as stocks enable donors to contribute more to an organization and its mission than they might be able to on their own.

If an individual purchases $100 in stock from a company that has since appreciated to double in value, they will be able to funnel $200 toward a cause that they care about⁠—despite having only paid $100 for the initial stock shares! (And if the donor’s employer will match their stock donation, the end value can reach higher than $400⁠—but more on that later.)

Additionally, when donating stocks that have been appreciating for more than a year, donors actually contribute 20% more to the nonprofit than if they had first sold their stocks and made a cash donation with the proceeds. That’s because when an individual sells their stock, they’re subject to pay significant capital gains taxes, which are not applicable should they transfer the stock to the receiving organization.

Are all stocks able to be donated to nonprofit organizations?

Most stocks will be eligible for donation purposes to most nonprofit causes. However, some organizations may place certain stipulations on the types of companies whose stocks they will and will not accept.

For example, the American Heart Association refuses donations of stock or other interests in companies relating to tobacco, nicotine delivery, or cannabis. In the case that an individual attempts a stock donation that is not accepted by the organization to which they gave, the securities will ultimately be returned to the donor.

Nonprofits That Accept Stock Donations

Many nonprofit organizations accept charitable gifts of stocks and mutual funds, and the trend is continuing to grow. In the next few years, we can expect more and more charitable causes to collect and incorporate gifts of securities into their overall fundraising strategies.

As of now, we’ve pulled a list of a few well-known causes and their current guidelines for donating stock.

Donors interested in contributing stock to a particular cause are encouraged to explore their website, as the information regarding stock donation acceptance is often included within the organization’s “ways to give” page.

American Heart Association accepts stock donations and matching gifts.

1. American Heart Association

The American Heart Association (or AHA) gladly accepts gifts of stocks (and mutual funds) from generous donors and provides easily accessible guidelines and instructions for multiple methods of doing so.

Here’s what their website had to say:

“You can use stock to support the organization through:

  • Electronic transfer – Your broker can transfer shares using the AHA’s Depository Trust Company (DTC) number and account number to ensure delivery.
  • Mail – You can mail paper certificates to the AHA.

Electronic Delivery of mutual fund shares is the most secure and practical delivery process available. If you would like to donate a gift of mutual funds to the American Heart Association, please contact us to confirm AHA’s brokers can accept the funds.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

LLS accepts stock donations and matching gifts.

2. Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, also known as LLS, encourages charitable donations of stock and mutual fund assets as well. They even provide a brief overview of the tax benefits offered to stock donors who are considering the option!

Here’s what their website had to say:

“If you own stock or a mutual fund that has appreciated in price since you purchased it, consider using that asset for your charitable giving. You get an income tax deduction for the full market value of donated securities that you have owned more than one year and you will avoid the capital gains tax on the appreciated value.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

ASPCA accepts stock donations and matching gifts.

3. American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

The ASPCA is another organization that accepts stock transfer donations as a way for donors to support their cause. Within their plethora of suggested giving methods, gifts of security are highlighted along with detailed instructions on how to conduct the transfer process.

Here’s what their website had to say:

“For credit to ASPCA – American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals – Prior to transfer, please call the organization with the name of stock and number of shares to be transferred.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

Syracuse University accepts stock donations and matching gifts.

4. Syracuse University

Syracuse University provides donors and prospects with information regarding multiple kinds of stock donations⁠—including marketable securities, closely-held securities, electronic stock transfers via DTC, and mutual fund transfers. Their site also prominently displays contact information for the university’s advancement department which will help facilitate the transfer!

Here’s what their website had to say:

“When planning to make a gift of securities to Syracuse University, please notify Advancement Services. Gifts of publicly traded securities that have appreciated in value allow you to claim a charitable deduction for the full market value of the securities on the date the gift is made. You pay no capital gains tax on the appreciation.

Gifts of stock in closely held corporations may result in substantial tax benefits in the form of charitable deductions and avoidance of capital gains taxes. Closely held securities can be especially attractive in funding charitable remainder trusts or charitable remainder lead trusts. Because special regulations apply to gifts of this kind, we encourage you to consult your tax adviser and the University’s development staff when considering such a gift.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

Piedmont Healthcare accepts stock donations and matching gifts.

5. Piedmont Healthcare

Piedmont Healthcare utilizes its website to encourage stock donations by interested supporters. One way they do so is by briefly highlighting the benefits to both their institution as well as to the donor contributing the appreciated securities (of both stocks and mutual funds).

Here’s what their website had to say:

“Gifts of appreciated securities, such as stocks or mutual funds, that have been held for over a year are a wonderful way to support Piedmont while potentially realizing important benefits for yourself.

Instruct your broker to transfer shares to Piedmont Healthcare Foundation by contacting Truist Bank via phone or email.

Contact your mutual fund company about the process of transferring mutual fund shares. A special form and signature guarantee will likely be required by them to initiate a charitable transfer.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

FSU accepts stock donations and matching gifts.

6. Florida State University

Florida State University provides stock donors (and prospective donors) with detailed instructions that outline the securities transfer process. The FSU Foundation incorporates tips and tricks for donors aiming to contribute stock to the university, whether electronically or with physical certificates.

Here’s what their website had to say:

“When donors’ securities are held in a brokerage account, the donor instructs their broker to transfer the securities to the university’s account.

Donors should also request that their brokers send confirmation of transfer to the FSU Foundation, Inc. The confirmation should indicate the donor’s name, the security being transferred, the Foundation account which should be used, and the date of transfer. Donors should then follow up with a letter to the FSU Foundation with instructions regarding their gift designation so that the gift can be properly credited.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

National Kidney Foundation accepts stock donations and matching gifts.

7. National Kidney Foundation

The National Kidney Foundation includes stock donations as one of their suggested ways to support the institution⁠—along with other giving ideas such as cryptocurrency, vehicle donations, fundraising events, and more.

This organization provides interested stock donors with a downloadable PDF made available through their “Get Involved” web page.

Here’s what their website had to say:

“Please complete and email the included form to Cornerstone Advisors Asset Management prior to transfer.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

Lazarex accepts stock donations and matching gifts.

8. Lazarex Cancer Foundation

The Lazarex Cancer Foundation also encourages stock donations within their “How You Can Help” page. This section quickly highlights the significant tax benefits to the organization and the subsequently increased impact a supporter’s gift can make.

Here’s what their website had to say:

“Did you know that your gift could go further by donating stock directly? Direct stock gifts let us use 100% of your donation, rather than losing up to 37% of it to capital gains tax. Thus, you can make a bigger impact at zero additional cost to you. If you would like to make a stock donation, please contact the Lazarex team.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

Matching Stock Donations: The Basics

Clearly, stock donations are a great stream of additional fundraising revenue for nonprofits, and they’re becoming an increasingly sought after resource. At the same time, organizations are looking to get their charitable donations matched by donors’ employing companies.

So, do the two ideas coincide at all? Here’s what your fundraising team needs to know about the relationship between nonprofit stock donations and matching gifts.

Are stock donations typically eligible for corporate matching gift programs?

The #1 factor that determines whether an individual’s stock donation is eligible for a match through their employer is who their employer is and what that company has established in its matching gift program guidelines.

For example, some companies consider gifts of securities a particular form of in-kind donation (which are, unfortunately, not match-eligible in most cases). In that case, stock donations made by employees of these companies may not be eligible to request a financial match.

On the other hand, many businesses have classified stock donations as a form of monetary gift (in the likes of cash, debit/credit payments, or bank transfers) or a common exception to the in-kind donation rule. Donors employed by these companies are typically able to secure a gift match on behalf of your organization⁠—so long as the value of the stock falls between the businesses’ predetermined thresholds.

Additionally, you’ll want to keep in mind that, as gifts of securities continue to grow in popularity among donors, we can expect many companies to begin adopting stock-inclusive matching gift program criteria for employee gifts in the near future.

How can I know if an individual’s stock donation qualifies for a match?

Let’s say your organization has just received a generous stock donation from a supporter of your cause. You may already know that their employer offers a matching gift program, and you’re looking to determine whether the stock gift is eligible for a match as well. Or, perhaps you’re unaware of whether the employing company matches any sort of employee donations to begin with. In either case, the answer should be located within the corporation’s matching gift program guidelines.

Nonprofits looking for this information may decide to conduct an online search for a company’s publicly-facing matching gift program guidelines to determine whether stock donations are mentioned. Donors seeking the information on their employers’ giving program can do a similar search of online resources, or they may look to internal documentation in an office policy handbook, workplace giving portal, etc.

However, the easiest way to uncover match-eligibility status for any donation⁠—stock or otherwise⁠—is by utilizing a matching gift company database.

Luckily, Double the Donation offers the most comprehensive database available, with detailed listings for tens of thousands of companies. Nonprofits and donors alike can begin typing a company’s name within the embedded autocompleting search tool and be instantaneously met with match qualifications, types of eligible donations, and more.

Find out a company's policies for nonprofit stock donations and matching gifts with a searchable company database.

If the provided guidelines mention stock donations as a viable option for matching donations, you have your answer⁠—the gift of stock is likely matchable for your cause!

If available documentation fails to reference gifts of securities at all, on the other hand, it’s likely that the donation would not be eligible for a corporate match. However, we recommend encouraging donors to inquire about the possibility with their companies to find the most definitive answer to the question at hand.

What are corporate stock donation matches worth?

When a stock donation⁠ (that has previously been identified as eligible for a corporate matching gift⁠) is requested by a donor, the employer typically agrees to match the value of the stock on the day on which the stock transfer was made.

Thus, nonprofit donors are able to secure a match by their employer equal to the purchase price plus the appreciated value of the stock⁠—which is typically greater than the individual’s initial financial investment!

Nonprofit stock donations and matching gifts process

What trends are expected regarding stock donations and matching gifts?

As of 2022, it’s estimated that the majority of companies with employee donation-matching programs do not currently provide matches for gifts of stock and mutual fund contributions. However, more and more companies are matching these gifts⁠—and leading the way toward others eventually following suit.

The more popular stock grows as a form of nonprofit giving, the more companies will adopt stock-inclusive matching gift program guidelines.

And when you take a look at the financial benefits to parties on both sides of the transaction (one research study reported fundraising growth of up to 55% for organizations that allowed non-cash donations such as stock as viable donation options!), and the ease with which gifts of securities are becoming, it’s likely a trend that we’re just seeing the beginnings of.

Companies That Match Stock Donations

Companies that match employee stock donations do so for the same reason as to why they match cash donations. These typically include corporate tax benefits, increased employee engagement, and positive public relations efforts.

Though not all businesses with gift-matching programs consider stock donations as matching gift eligible, many do. Here are a few examples of companies that match stock donations made by their employees to qualifying charities!

Chevron matches gifts of stock donations.

1. Chevron

Chevron is well-regarded as having a generous corporate matching gift program, agreeing to match up to $10,000 in charitable donations per employee on an annual basis. And the best part is that they do match the market value of stock donations that their employees transfer to nearly all nonprofit organizations.

Here’s a glimpse at what Chevron says about stock donations and matching gifts:

“Gifts can be given to nonprofits on the Chevron Humankind site via a payroll deduction or credit card payment, or given directly to the nonprofit offline (e.g. check, cash, stock, etc.).”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

Google matches gifts of stock donations.

2. Google

Google offers both full and part-time employees the opportunity to participate in its corporate gift-matching initiative! Gifts worth up to $10,000 (including stock donations) will be matched to many nonprofit causes, including educational institutions, health and human services, cultural and community organizations, environmental nonprofits, and more.

Here’s a glimpse at what Google says about stock donations and matching gifts:

“Your gift must be in the form of check, credit card or marketable securities with a quoted market value. Gifts of securities will be matched with cash. The value of the stock will be calculated using the price at the close of the market on the day of transfer of the security.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

General Electric matches gifts of stock donations.

3. General Electric

General Electric has matched a wide range of employee donations since 1954. In fact, it was the first corporation to roll out a corporate gift-matching program, though it was a fairly limited offering compared to what we see now!

Since then, GE has expanded its employee giving program to encompass new methods of giving⁠—including contributing securities⁠ such as stocks—as well as more nonprofits being eligible to receive funding.

Here’s a glimpse at what General Electric says about stock donations and matching gifts:

“Gifts may be made via cash, check, debit/credit card, or stock. Gifts may also be made by current payment from an entity such as a personal foundation or donor advised fund if that entity has been funded solely by the eligible GE participant.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

Merck matches gifts of stock donations.

4. Merck

Merck & Co. matches numerous types of employee donations to charitable organizations. Within the company’s matching program criteria, they include a fairly detailed account of stock donations⁠—including the process for requesting a corporate match and the benefits employees receive from giving this way.

Here’s a glimpse at what Merck says about stock donations and matching gifts:

“Matching funds can be requested for one-time cash, check, credit card, or stock donations, via the Merck Gives Back (MGB) website.

When making a stock donation, enter the market value of the stock on the day you issued the stock to the nonprofit organization. The organization will be asked to confirm the realized value of the stock donation and the Merck Foundation P4G program will match funds equal to the realized value of donated stock.

You can deduct the full current value of the stock (regardless of purchase price) and avoid the capital gains taxes associated with selling the stock for profit; therefore, you pay no taxes on the appreciated value of the stock and take the full deduction for the current value of the stock.

You may not donate Merck stock options; however, you may donate Merck stock after you exercise your options.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

State Farm matches gifts of stock donations.

5. State Farm

State Farm Insurance matches donations made by current full-time employees, part-time team members, and retired workers alike⁠—in any way they give to nonprofits. This includes gifts of securities and mutual funds, for which they detail a few stipulations of match eligibility.

Here’s a glimpse at what State Farm says about stock donations and matching gifts:

“Donations of Mutual Funds Units and Securities traded on the New York Stock Exchange, American Stock Exchange or NASDAQ National Market meeting the following requirements:

  • The eligible donor must be the sole owner or have final authority to transfer ownership of the security or mutual fund unit to the eligible organization.
  • Ownership must be signed over to the eligible organization.

Please note: The exact value of the donated securities or mutual fund units will be based on the closing market price the date the transfer is complete.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

Verizon matches gifts of stock donations.

6. Verizon

Verizon offers its employees multiple matching gift program options, the individual matching grants program being the one in which stock donations are considered match-eligible contributions. The company matches to nearly all 501(c)(3) organizations (or an equivalent internationally), with schools being eligible for a $5,000 donation or stock match and other nonprofits for a $1,000 donation or stock match.

Here’s a glimpse at what Verizon says about stock donations and matching gifts:

“Donations must be in one of the following forms: Personal check, Paypal, money order, payroll deduction, credit/debit card payment, wire/bank transfer, transfer of stock certificate.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.

Apple matches gifts of stock donations.

7. Apple

Apple offers a slightly different type of corporate stock donation-matching program but will match certain gifts of securities nonetheless. Instead of matching any kind of stock donations, Apple matches stock donations only of the Apple company itself.

Here’s a glimpse at what Apple says about stock donations and matching gifts:

“Visit the Employee Giving portal to request a matching donation for your volunteer time or to make a one-time or repeating monetary donation to the charitable organization (or cause) of your choice using a credit card or PayPal account. You can also request a match for a monetary or stock donation you’ve already made.

To be eligible, your monetary donations must be paid in full — not pledged — via cash, personal check, credit card, PayPal, or Apple stock.”

Read up on the full program guidelines here.


There’s no one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to nonprofit stock donations and matching gifts. Some companies will match employee gifts of securities, while others will not.

But the good news is that more and more corporations are beginning to be inclusive of stock and mutual fund donations within their employee matching programs. That means you’ll want to keep an eye out for new programs being established and existing matching gift companies expanding their eligibility criteria.

Interested in learning more about matching gifts and other nonprofit fundraising opportunities? Check out these other Double the Donation resources:

Elevate your monetary and stock donations and matching gifts with Double the Donation.

How CSR Impacts Businesses: A Guide for Corporations

How CSR Impacts Businesses: A Guide For Corporations

Corporate social responsibility (often referred to as the shortened ‘CSR’) is a practice followed by many companies where they work to improve society in some form. CSR is often seen in terms of philanthropy, environmental leadership, ethical labor practices, and economic responsibility.

If you’re wondering how CSR impacts businesses⁠—particularly the businesses that enact these practices in the first place⁠—the advantages are expansive.

In this complete CSR guide for businesses, we’ll dive deep into the benefits of corporate social responsibility⁠—everything your company needs to know on the topic to maximize the effectiveness of your efforts⁠—exploring the following topics:

Ready to get up to speed on socially responsible efforts and see what you can do to bring your business to the next level? Let’s begin!

FAQ - How CSR Impacts Businesses

FAQ: How CSR Impacts Businesses

Does your company have an existing CSR plan in place, or are you looking to dive into strategic corporate social responsibility for the first time? Either way, you’ll likely have some questions regarding the practice.

Let’s walk through five questions and answers that are often pondered by corporations such as yours!

What are the main components of corporate social responsibility?

Corporate social responsibility is an overarching term used to describe a wide range of corporate efforts that are designed to make the world a better place. Most CSR initiatives will encompass these key values:

Here are three main components of CSR for businesses.

  • Social ⁠— The “social” component of corporate social responsibility refers to a company’s impact on its community and the individuals within. Businesses following this practice should work to bring a positive net impact to people as a whole.
  • Environmental ⁠— Environmentalism is another key pillar of CSR. Rather than the people within the communities in which a business operates, environmental practices highlight the importance of preserving the ecosystems themselves. Historically, corporations have been responsible for the vast majority of global emissions and other causes of climate change. Now, many businesses are working to reverse the damage through environmentally-friendly initiatives in the way they manage operations.
  • Economic ⁠— CSR also incorporates responsible economic business practices where companies give generously to their communities, often in terms of nonprofit donations, fair wages, and more. The idea behind economic responsibility is that the #1 goal of a business should not be to funnel as many dollars as possible into the pockets of investors and other shareholders. Instead, companies should bring economic benefit to all stakeholders⁠—including employees, customers, suppliers, and overall communities.

Some CSR efforts may incorporate elements from multiple categories, too!

For example, a company financially contributing to an environmentally-focused nonprofit (whether through grants, matching gifts, etc.) can fall under both environmental and economic responsibilities.

How can a company become more socially responsible?

There are tons of practices that businesses of all shapes, sizes, and sectors are adopting in order to increase their level of corporate social responsibility. Here are a few things a company might do:

  • Offer competitive wages and benefits packages to employees.
  • Provide generous parental leave, tuition reimbursement, and retirement benefits.
  • Participate in workplace giving programs such as matching gifts and volunteer grants.
  • Support philanthropic causes in the form of monetary and in-kind donations.
  • Use recycled materials while also producing goods that are also recyclable.
  • Reduce carbon emissions from business operations.
  • Keep up with and pay corporate taxes dutifully.

The tactics you choose to employ at your business can also play a role in the benefits you see overall. For example, prioritizing staff wages and employee benefits can have a significant effect on the company’s internal culture and team member engagement. While this will likely also result in improved consumer relations (i.e., buyers like to shop with businesses they know treat employees well), the impact seen might be lesser as compared to that of the employees.

And the same is true the other way around! Producing ethical goods with sustainable practices can bring positive results to both consumers and employees, though consumer relations may see a larger, more tangible impact in terms of sales.

What is ESG and how does it compare to CSR?

There are a lot of acronyms in the corporate world, as you surely know. As a refresher, CSR refers to corporate social responsibility.

Now, here’s another one you might hear, especially in conversations about social responsibility: ESG.

ESG stands for environmental, social, and governance, and is a measure of the extent to which a business makes a positive impact on society beyond its own shareholders.

While the two ideas go hand in hand, they’re not entirely synonymous⁠. One of the largest differentiators between the concepts is that CSR is a business model used to hold a company accountable for its actions to society, while ESG is a quantifiable measurement of a company’s social impact outcome.

How can I get my employees to participate in CSR?

Positive employee relations can be a top motivator of corporate social responsibility efforts in companies. But did you know that the employees themselves can actually participate⁠ (and benefit⁠) as well? These employee-driven programs can even see increasingly positive internal results!

For example, employees who participate in a company’s matching gifts or volunteer grant programs benefit from knowing their own nonprofit donations or volunteer hours are making even more significant impacts on charitable causes that they care about. Plus, they know their employers are making an effort to support their favorite charities as well.

So how can you drive participation in these programs once they’re up and running? Here are a few ideas:

  • Promote new and existing CSR initiatives to employees, including specific instructions on how to get involved.
  • Highlight your company’s social impact efforts during conversations with candidates and new hires.
  • Gamify CSR with interactive elements such as badges, rewards, trophies, and more for top participants.
  • Encourage friendly competition among employees to see which teams or individuals are the most CSR-involved.
  • Set company-wide goals for participation, along with company-wide benefits for reaching those goals.
  • Empower employees to suggest new ideas and feedback for existing efforts in order to continually refine your corporate social responsibility.

Workplace giving efforts, in particular, enable businesses to empower employees with hands-on roles in the company’s CSR. When employees feel they have a direct say in their employers’ social impact efforts, they’ll be increasingly aware of the efforts in place, and more likely to be highly engaged with the business.

What are new CSR trends that businesses are adopting?

As the world is changing, innovative technologies are developed, and new social, environmental, and economic needs arise, the CSR movement will continue to evolve. Here are a few things you can expect to see in the near future!

Many companies are transitioning to more employee-driven CSR programs⁠—especially when it comes to philanthropy. In fact, our research reports that over 39% of companies aim to expand their workplace giving initiatives in the next two years!

Additionally, more and more companies are wanting to take a stand on social issues and other current events in the past few years. Though these issues may sometimes be controversial, a 2020 research study reported that nearly 60% of consumers expect the brands they support to have a position on topics such as racial discrimination, social justice, climate change, income inequality, and more. 50% of survey respondents even reported conducting online research to see how a business reacts to social issues before making a buying decision!

Not to mention, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (or DEI) continues to see significant growth at the forefront of many businesses’ practices. As a result, companies are placing a higher emphasis on developing an inclusive and diverse workplace that’s welcoming to people of all races, genders, religions, sexual orientations, ethnicities, socioeconomic statuses, disabilities, and more.

Statistics on how CSR impacts businesses

Key CSR Statistics Businesses Should Know

There are tons of reasons why a business might participate in corporate social responsibility⁠—many of which boil down to the effects seen by the company’s employees and consumers alike.

Here are some key facts and figures that help communicate the implications of CSR:

Statistics that communicate how CSR impacts businesses.

How CSR Impacts Businesses’ Employees

(Sources: Double the Donation and re: Charity)

71% of employees state that it’s very important to work at a company that partakes in philanthropy.

More than 54% of employees who are proud of their company’s contributions to society report being fully engaged in their job.

77% of employees reported a sense of purpose as part of the reason they selected their current employer.

Nearly 2/3 of young employees won’t take a job at a company with poor CSR practices.

55% of employees would even take a pay cut to work for a socially responsible company.

Engaging in socially valuable efforts can reduce staff turnover by approximately 50%.

93% of employees believe companies must lead with purpose.

How CSR Impacts Businesses’ Consumers

(Sources: Harvard Business School and ViewsForChange)

72% of consumers believe companies should have a legal responsibility to society.

77% of consumers are motivated to purchase from companies committed to making the world a better place.

Over 90% of consumers worldwide are likely to switch to brands supporting a good cause.

More than 66% of consumers would pay more to socially and environmentally responsible businesses.

Creating value for the customer, positively impacting society, and inspiring innovation and positive change are the three highest-ranking components of a company’s purpose.

88% of people want to know about a company’s CSR efforts.

How CSR Impacts Businesses - top benefits

4 Top Benefits of CSR for Businesses

Beyond the ideas of basic altruism, corporate social responsibility tactics also provide participating companies with powerful business benefits. Consumers, employees, and other essential shareholders will be more inclined to support your efforts, and you’ll see impactful results such as these!

Top reasons how CSR impacts businesses

1. Unique marketing opportunities

Cause marketing (or cause-related marketing) is a form of CSR in which a business supports a charitable cause while receiving strategic marketing benefits from the relationship. These types of CSR campaigns often involve a company offering to give a certain amount of money to a nonprofit organization in response to increased sales results (for example, 10% of a company’s profits may be donated to charity or a business may donate $1,000 for every 100 products sold).

When done well, cause marketing enables consumers to feel good about their purchases to socially responsible companies. As a result, the consumers are willing to pay a higher price, switch brand loyalties, or increase quantities of their purchases due to it benefiting a good cause.

So for your business, not only will you have the opportunity to participate in charitable efforts, but you’ll also gain more customers and more dollars toward your bottom line.

2. Increased employee engagement

The fact is, people want to work for companies that they feel good about contributing to. When an individual knows that their efforts at a business help drive social good, they’ll be driven to produce elevated results in their roles. And for that reason, there’s a significant positive correlation between employee engagement and corporate giving.

Pride in the company, along with belief in senior leadership, are some of the most essential drivers of employee engagement levels⁠—and luckily, both components see benefits from social responsibility as well.

When employees are particularly engaged, the company will also see high levels of productivity, increased retention rates, and more.

3. New talent attracted to your team

Just like effective CSR efforts drive existing employees to want to do more in their roles at your company, the same efforts can also be used to attract new employees to the team.

As a result, many HR representatives are prioritizing corporate social responsibility in their recruiting efforts and within conversations with prospective candidates. Individuals looking to join a company that participates in CSR will be drawn to your business, and you’ll have a competitive advantage against other potential employers.

4. Improved internal company culture

Companies partaking in CSR also tend to have more positive internal cultures, which, of course, helps drive increased levels of engagement and retention. Company culture is more of an abstract concept and often incorporates the attitudes and behaviors of the business, its leadership, and its employees altogether.

Let’s take a look at a few examples to see how this works. Here are three types of CSR initiatives that can bring about a positive business culture:

  • Group volunteer opportunities. Picture this⁠—your company is looking for a fun out-of-office team-building activity to boost morale and get staff members better acquainted with one another. You reach out to a local food pantry and decide to organize a company-wide volunteer excursion. Employees come out to participate one Saturday afternoon and get to spend time with their colleagues in an informal setting which helps strengthen relationships while enabling your team to make a positive impact on your community.
  • Annual giving campaigns. Imagine that, once a year, your company hosts an annual employee giving campaign benefitting your neighborhood animal shelter. Employees are encouraged to bring in pet supplies and cash donations, and you turn it into a competition between departments. Whichever team collects the most for the shelter receives a prize, while a sense of friendly competition brings the business as a whole closer together.
  • Fundraising events. Let’s say a nonprofit is hosting a 5K event to raise money for their medical research. Your company decides to get involved, forming a team of employee team members willing to collect pledges and participate in the final event. Staff participants get to know each other throughout the fundraising process. Individuals share tips and tricks to drive total donations and help reach a company-wide goal. You participate in the event and, after the walk, celebrate your success with a pizza party!

Utilizing philanthropic initiatives as a way to build a positive company culture is a common practice for many businesses. But remember, the most successful efforts involve hands-on involvement by leadership as well.

When employees see their management and company leaders participating, they’ll be more inclined to do so themselves. And when individual team members get involved, the company’s culture is more likely to benefit.

Examples of businesses doing CSR right - and how CSR impacts those companies

5 Examples of Businesses Doing CSR Right

Looking to get started with CSR efforts but not sure how to begin? Get inspired by these popular companies who have exemplified what it looks like to be socially responsible and philanthropic (while also remaining profitable!).

Here's an example of how CSR impacts businesses like Gilead.

Gilead Sciences

When it comes to philanthropic corporations, Gilead Sciences has led the pack for several years in a row. This biotechnology company contributes an average of $400 million each year to nonprofit causes, which comes out to a total of nearly 3% of their pre-tax profits. Plus, they offer a matching gift program for current full-time employees, agreeing to match donations of up to $2,000 per year to most nonprofit organizations!

They’ve also published a number of lofty goals to further elevate their CSR by 2030⁠—including achieving net zero operational greenhouse gas emissions, ensuring 100% of their packaging is recyclable, eliminating all unnecessary plastics, and significantly increasing Black, Hispanic, and female representation in the company.

Here's an example of how CSR impacts businesses like Johnson and Johnson.

Johnson & Johnson

Johnson & Johnson has prioritized reducing their company’s impact on the planet over the last three decades by highlighting the importance of sustainable business practices. One key pillar of this effort was accomplished by harnessing wind power to significantly reduce pollution from their operations and ultimately offering up a renewable (and economic) alternative to traditional electricity.

In addition to the company’s environmental efforts, Johnson & Johnson also donates generously to many nonprofit organizations, including schools, health and human services, civic and community organizations, and more. Much of this funding is contributed through workplace giving programs as well, matching team member donations at a 2:1 rate up to $20,000 per employee per year!

Here's an example of how CSR impacts businesses like Google.

Google

Google is another example of a highly regarded business with multiple effective CSR efforts in place. As a result, the company has earned the Reputation Institute’s highest CSR score, due in part to its philanthropic initiatives, renewable energy projects, and environmental impact reduction.

Not only do their data centers use 50% less energy than other comparable institutions, but they’ve also committed more than $1 billion to develop environmental efforts in the future. Plus, they have a generous donation-matching program, offering up to a $10,000 gift match for full- and part-time employees.

Here's an example of how CSR impacts businesses like Lyft.

Lyft

One example of a business hosting a successful cause marketing campaign as a component of an overall CSR strategy is Lyft. Through their recent partnership with organizations like Bread of Life, United Way, and the National Council on Aging, Lyft offered free rides to essential workers and vulnerable populations through an initiative called LyftUp during the COVID-19 pandemic.

With this model in place, Lyft has elevated its brand reputation as one that cares about the underserved in its communities, thus driving popularity and sales.

Here's an example of how CSR impacts businesses like Ben & Jerry's.

Ben & Jerry’s

Since 1988, Ben & Jerry’s has been known for being a particularly outspoken advocate for all sorts of social causes. The company has partnered with nonprofit organizations such as 1% for Peace, Farm Aid, Children’s Defense Fund, Rock the Vote, Alaska Wilderness League, MyClimate and NativeEnergy, and many more to provide aid for social, environmental, economic, and scientific causes.

They’ve also launched more than one ice cream flavor dedicated to their favorite social causes, which include their “Save Our Swirled,” “Empower Mint,” “Justice ReMix’d,” and “Peace Pop.”


Corporate social responsibility is often framed as a win-win-win situation because companies, nonprofits, and the greater community each benefit greatly from its existence. As you consider how CSR impacts businesses like yours, think about all the good you can do in the world as well!

Ready to learn more about the benefits of corporate social responsibility and philanthropy to businesses like yours? Check out these other guides:

Find out how to drive corporate philanthropy at your company!

Learn more about how matching gifts can help you raise more for causes against social injustice.

Check Your Match Eligibility for Donations to Social Justice and Black Lives Matter Causes

Learn more about how matching gifts can help you raise more for causes against social injustice.

Check Your Match Eligibility for Donations to Social Justice and Black Lives Matter Causes

Hundreds of thousands of individuals across the US and the world have gathered to protest police violence and other social injustices. In support of these protests and the Black Lives Matter cause, many individuals are choosing to donate to a wide range of local and national nonprofits with missions that counter these injustices.

What many donors don’t know is that they can make the impact of their donations go twice as far by tapping into their companies’ matching gift programs.

Here at Double the Donation, we’re here to show our support by sharing the most comprehensive database on companies that match donations with you.

Fast Facts About Matching Gifts:

If you’re newly exploring matching gifts and other forms of corporate philanthropy, here are a few facts that can show the power of these programs.

  • About 18 Million individuals work for companies with matching gift programs. This represents about 10% of the workforce.
  • About 2/3s of companies with matching gift programs match to nearly any 501c3 organization (Ex. Nonprofits focused on Social Justice causes like Black Lives Matter).
  • Each year $4-7 billion in matching gift potential goes unclaimed. It’s our goal to close that gap!

Source: Double the Donation’s Database and Analysis of Matching Gift Programs

See if Your Company Matches Donations

Double the Donation maintains the largest and most comprehensive database of companies with corporate philanthropy programs. Nonprofits have found increases in donation revenue by embedding our matching gift search tool into their online donation process.

The tool raises awareness among donors of matching gift opportunities and informs them of their eligibility so that they can identify the proper forms to request such gifts from their employers. We’ve helped nonprofits raise hundreds of millions of dollars in additional matching gifts year after year. Now, more than ever, it’s important to make our matching gift database available for anyone to use.

So here it is! Go ahead and search for your employer to see if you’re eligible for a matched gift that can further increase the impact of your donation. 

You’ll be able to access matching gift information like company maximums, how to submit your match, causes that a company will match to, and much more! There’s also information in our database about companies that offer grants when employees volunteer:

Share this URL to provide supporters with free access to our database and let’s get donations to this cause matched!

https://doublethedonation.com/companies-matching-donations-to-social-justice-and-black-lives-matter-causes/

We’ll be making our full matching gift company database available for free on this page through June 30th.

Corporate Matching Gift Programs Launched in Response to Black Lives Matter and Ongoing Social Justice Causes

We’ve seen hundreds of companies launch new matching gift programs for their employees as a way to support the causes that individuals are passionate about. Particularly, many organizations are expanding their programs or creating new incentives to show their interest and support for the Black Lives Matter movement.

If your donors are working for any of the following programs, they’ll be able to receive Here are just a few that can serve as examples for any business owner or company that would like to launch a program:

23andme

Matching employee donations to Black Lives Matter, Equal Justice Initiative, and Black Girls Code.

Apple

Pledged to donate to a number of groups including the Equal Justice Initiative — and to match 2:1 all employee contributions in the month of June.

Bravado

Matching employee donations to NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Equal Justice Initiative, Black Girls Code, Black Lives Matter, Minnesota Freedom Fund, Survived and Punished, National Bail Fund Network, and BYP100.

CEO Sahil Mansuri also personally pledged to donate $10,000 to various groups and to match employee donations 3:1.

Double the Donation (We can’t leave ourselves out):

  • Special 2:1 match on donations made by employees to any Social Justice, Black Lives Matters, or Pride-related cause
  • Fundraising Match – If employees raise money for a cause, Double the Donation will provide a grant to that cause
  • Volunteer Match – If employees volunteer with a cause over the next month, the company will provide a grant to that organization

Duolingo

Etsy

Pledged $500,000 to the Equal Justice Initiative and $500,000 to Borealis Philanthropy’s Black-Led Movement Fund. Also matching employee donations.

Flexport

Pledged up to $180,000 ($100 per employee) to match employee donations to social justice causes of each employee’s choice in June.

Helpscout

Matching employee donations up to $300,000 to various organizations.

Stitch Fix

Pledged $100,000 to Black Lives Matter, and will match an additional $100,000 of employee donations to the organization.

Know about a company that you’d like for us to include here or in our database? Let us know by emailing socialjustice@doublethedonation.com with specific program info.

Top Companies with Year-Round Employee Matching Gift Programs:

65% of Fortune 500 companies (and many others) match donations made by employees year-round for a wide variety of philanthropic causes. Here are a few of the top companies that offer matching gift programs:

Home Depot

The Home Depot will match up to $1,000 per employee for each organization they donate to, with a maximum of $3,000 per employee.

Disney

The Walt Disney Company matches donations to most nonprofits made by full-time and part-time employees, though retirees are not eligible. The company will match up to $25,000 at a ratio of 1:1. The Walt Disney Company offers volunteer grants to its employees for a minimum of 10 hours of volunteering, depending on the number of hours they contribute. The maximum match amount is $2,000, with additional grants available up to $2,500.

Microsoft

Microsoft matches up to $15,000 at a 1:1 ratio. Full-time and part-time employees can submit requests for a match at any point during the last 12 months.

If you’d like to learn more about companies that we recognize as having the world’s best matching gift programs, check out these links:

Find out what happens when two spouses, who both work at matching gift companies, donate to a nonprofit.

Matching Gifts: When Spouses Both Donate to a Nonprofit

For most nonprofits, the topic of matching gifts is confusing enough as it is. However, the fine print can make it even more confusing, often turning donors away from taking advantage of corporate philanthropy. For instance, what happens when two spouses (both of which work for companies with matching gift programs) submit matching gifts separately to your organization?

Oftentimes, when a nonprofit’s fundraising team can’t find out the answer, the organization gives up when it could have received both matches. To fully understand situations like this, let’s dive into a few key questions:

  1. Are Both Spouses Eligible to Receive a Match for the Same Organization?
  2. How Can Nonprofits Promote Matching Gift Programs for Spouses?
  3. How Can a Matching Gift Database Help Identify These Opportunities?

Corporate philanthropy, like matching gift programs, is vital to nonprofit success. Let’s dive into common matching gift guidelines for situations like this.
When two spouses work for matching gift companies donate to your nonprofit, are they both eligible to have their donations matched?

1. Are Both Spouses Eligible to Receive a Match for the Same Organization?

In most cases, both spouses are able to submit a matching gift request to their respective employers. Assuming the standard case where companies match donations dollar-for-dollar, a single donation would effectively be tripled. We rarely, if ever, see a rule preventing a gift from being matched by multiple companies.

A more common occurrence is for both spouses to work for the same company that offers matching gifts. If that’s the case, one of three things typically occurs:

  1. The company will provide a double match. For example, rather than matching at a 1:1 ratio, the company will match at a 2:1 ratio.
  2. The company will provide the same matching gift ratio but will double the limit. For instance, instead of matching all donations up to $5,000 annually, the company will match donations up to $10,000 annually.
  3. The company provides the couple with the same benefit that an individual employee receives.

To stay up-to-date on your donors’ matching gift eligibility, jump ahead to learn about matching gift databases.
Learn how your nonprofit can promote matching gift programs to donors who are spouses.

2. How Can Nonprofits Promote Matching Gift Programs for Spouses?

Your organization may already incorporate many of our top ways to promote employee matching gifts, but don’t forget to also promote matching gifts for spouses.

For instance, do you provide donors with acknowledgement letters after they submit the matching gift request or upon receiving the actual grant from the company? If so, that would be a great time to encourage donors to ask their spouse if his or her company offers a matching gift program, too.

Simply reminding them that their donation could make even more of an impact increases the likelihood that they’ll look into it. Once a donor has gone through the match request process themselves, they’ll realize how straightforward it is.

From here, ask them to also find out if their spouse’s employer offers a similar program so the donation can be tripled! Since they’ve gone through the simple match request process themselves, they can relay the necessary information to their spouse.

Remember, if you subscribe to Double the Donation’s service, direct your supporters to your organization’s matching gift and volunteer grant webpage with our tool. That way, they can instantly determine their eligibility and submit the appropriate forms.
Learn how a matching gift database can clear up guidelines for donors who are spouses and both work for matching gift companies.

3. How Can a Matching Gift Database Help Identify These Opportunities?

While most employers will match both donations made by spouses, company guidelines do vary. As a nonprofit professional, you’ll need to stay on top of your donors’ personal data, such as their eligibility for matches through their employers. The research phase is an ongoing, arduous process. That’s where Double the Donation, the industry’s leading matching gift database, can help!

With Double the Donation, both your nonprofit team and your donors can instantly receive up-to-date information on their employers’ giving programs. This includes available guidelines, forms, requirements (e.g. donation minimums and maximums), and other relevant information. Plus, it easily integrates with other software, so you won’t have to worry about transferring all your data.

For larger organizations, check out 360MatchPro by Double the Donation. This comprehensive software enables email automation, customizable matching gift tracking, and other useful automation features!

With either platform, your nonprofit won’t miss out on important corporate giving opportunities. Whenever two spouses donate to your organization, they’ll instantly know if they are both eligible for matches through their employer, simply by searching their companies’ names. No more confusion on anyone’s part!

Think your organization could benefit?


Matching gifts are not something your nonprofit wants to overlook. They’re fairly straightforward to acquire, but it can get tricky when two spouses both donate to your nonprofit. In some cases, they work for separate matching gift companies, and in others, they work for the same company. It’s all about making sense of companies’ guidelines.

Now that you know typical outcomes and how to identify these opportunities, start maximizing your matching gift potential!

Learn more about matching gifts and higher education, including top companies that match gifts to colleges and universities.

Matching Gifts & Higher Education: Companies That Match [+Tips]

Matching Gifts & Higher Education: Companies That Match [+Tips]
If you’ve graduated college, chances are, your alma mater has contacted you asking for a donation at some point. Perhaps this happened even before you graduated. Statistics show that many alumni actually do donate to their colleges and universities. Luckily, many of these generous gifts can be matched by alumni’s employers.

If you’d like to optimize your school’s matching gift fundraising efforts by targeting impactful corporate programs, incorporating tried-and-true best practices, and exploring examples put in place by similar institutions, this is the guide for you! We’ll cover:

Most matching gift programs began with only matching to colleges and universities. Since then, many companies have expanded their programs to include most other nonprofit organizations. However, there still remains a large contingent of companies that only match to higher education, excluding K-12 educational organizations and schools. And that means extra potential matching opportunities for your institution!

Let’s dive right in.

Here are some top companies that match gifts to colleges and universities to boost your matching gifts and higher education strategies.Top Companies that Match Gifts to Colleges and Universities

Almost all the companies you’ve heard offer matching gift programs (such as Bank of America, GE, Coca-Cola, Home Depot) will match gifts to colleges or universities, too. However, for this post, we decided to put together a list of some companies with lesser-known matching gift programs. Oftentimes, when a company only matches to higher education colleges and universities, their program flies under the radar.

If your college or university is looking to boost its matching gift revenue, be on the lookout for these popular matching gift companies!

Allstate Insurance

Allstate, a company that matches gifts to colleges and universities, that also offers volunteer grants.Allstate has an employee matching gift program completely devoted to higher education. Through the Good Hands Matching Grant Program, Allstate matches donations made to higher education institutions at a 1:1 rate. In other words, employee donations can potentially be doubled.

The company will match a range of donations from $25 to $5,000. Individuals who are eligible include employees, agency owners, personal financial representatives, and retirees.

Plus, Allstate also offers volunteer grants for employees who’d rather donate their time than money. Through the Hands in the Community Grants Program, employees and agency owners who volunteer more than 16 hours in a calendar year are eligible for volunteer grants.

The volunteer grant amount depends on the employee’s position. While regular employees are eligible for $500 volunteer grants, agency owners are eligible for $1,000 volunteer grants.

Read more about Allstate’s matching gift program.

ConAgra Foods, Inc.

ConAgra is a company that matches gifts of $25 to $1,000 made to colleges and universities.ConAgra will match gifts made to higher education between $25 and $1,000. Both full-time and part-time employees are eligible. However, retirees are not eligible. They also donate to other educational organizations, such as nutrition education programs.

To submit a request, employees either fill out a paper form or an electronic form. Unlike most companies, employees aren’t restricted to just one type of form. However, they do have to submit the matching gift request within 90 days of the initial donation. After that point, the company will no longer match the donation.

Read more about the ConAgra Foods matching gift program.

eBay, Inc.

eBay is a popular company that matches gifts to higher education as well as volunteer grants.The popular online auction site, eBay, will match employee donations made between $25 and $2,500 per year. The company increased the maximum from $500 just a few years ago, which is a substantial jump!

While full-time and part-time employees are eligible for the program, retired employees are not. In addition to matching gifts to education, eBay will also match gifts to most other nonprofit organizations. Unlike some companies, employees are urged to submit matching gift requests as soon as possible, because there’s a company-wide annual limit.

As part of its corporate philanthropy initiative, eBay also offers volunteer grants. Grant amounts are tier-based, depending on the number of volunteer hours employees finish:

  • 8-24 hours = a $100 grant
  • 25-49 hours = a $250 grant
  • 50+ hours = a $500 grant

Be on the lookout for this popular employer when developing your corporate giving strategy.

Read more about eBay’s matching gift program.

Sherwin-Williams

Sherwin Williams is a major company that offers matching gifts for colleges and universities.Sherwin-Williams offers a matching gift program where the company matches up to $3,000 in donations to a wide variety of nonprofits. This includes higher education institutions. The company’s matching gift program is open to both current employees as well as retirees.

The company matches at a 1.5:1 ratio. For instance, if a match-eligible individual donates $100 to your school, your institution will receive a $150 match, totaling $350.

In case that’s not impressive enough, Sherwin-Williams also has a great volunteer grant program. After an employee volunteers 50 hours, Sherwin-Williams provides the eligible organization or school with $200. Each employee can request up to three separate grants each year, totaling $600.

Read more about Sherwin-Williams’ matching gift program.

ExxonMobil

ExxonMobil, a company that offers matching gifts to colleges and universities, has a giving program dedicated to higher education.ExxonMobil is very well-known for its corporate philanthropy, specifically for its efforts toward educational institutions. The company offers two matching gift programs, the Arts and Cultural Matching Gift Program and the Educational Matching Gift Program.

Through the Educational Matching Gift Program, ExxonMobil will match donations to higher education institutions, including U.S. colleges and universities. They’ll provide up to $22,500 in matching gift funds per year. However, for cultural organizations, the company only matches up to $2,000.

Plus, the company offers two volunteer grant programs. For its individual grant program, when an employee or retiree volunteers for 20 hours, ExxonMobil provides a volunteer grant of $500. Each individual can request up to four grants per year. For its team volunteer involvement program, ExxonMobil awards a $500 grant when a team of five or more eligible participants volunteers for a combined total of at least 20 hours. While employees are limited to $2,000 in grants per year, individual organizations are limited to $5,000.

Read more about ExxonMobil’s matching gift program.

Here are some top tips for making the most of matching gifts and higher education, including partnering with companies that match gifts to colleges and universities.7 Best Practices for Matching Gifts and Higher Education

Now that you know of a few major companies that offer matching gifts to higher education institutions, let’s dive into a few ways you can incorporate them into your fundraising strategy. Let’s explore seven tried-and-true tips here!

1. Ensure your team understands the importance of matching gifts and higher education.

Before you can promote (and communicate the value of) matching gifts to your institution’s donor base, it’s critical that your fundraising team is up to speed. Be sure to incorporate department-wide meetings to explore matching gift opportunities, what that means for your institution, and how you can collect more corporate funding for your efforts.

And if you’re not sure your team understands the impact of matching gifts, consider sharing powerful statistics like these:

  • More than 26 million individuals work for companies that offer matching gift programs.
  • Over 78% of that 26 million (or approximately 20.3 million) people have no idea whether their employer matches gifts.
  • An estimated $2 to $3 billion is donated annually through corporate matching gift programs.
  • An additional $4 to $7 billion in available match funding is left on the table each year, largely due to a lack of awareness.
  • 84% of survey participants reported that they’d be more likely to donate to a nonprofit if their employer was matching the donation.
  • 1 in 3 participants stated that they’d likely make a larger donation if it was being matched.

Then, once they’re on board, you’ll likely want your development and fundraising staff to be familiar with top companies that match gifts to colleges and universities, common matching gift program guidelines to look out for, and how to assist donors as they walk through the process of requesting their employer matches.

And that’s just the beginning! As you continue to develop your matching gift strategy to direct more corporate dollars toward your school, it’s essential that everyone stays on the same page.

2. Enlist multiple methods for collecting alumni employment information.

Your alumni are likely some of your school’s most dedicated supporters. As they move on from your institution and begin their careers in the real world, make sure you have a process in place for collecting and tracking graduates’ employment information. This will enable you to screen donors and alumni against some of the most generous matching gift companies, such as those mentioned above.

More than likely, your alumni employment data search will include some combination of the following:

  • Matching gift software
  • Email domain screening
  • Employer appends
  • Alumni outreach

But you don’t have to pick just one method, either! The more you know, the better. Our research shows even that incorporating more than one approach for identifying matching gift eligible donors results in 77% more identified potential matches. So perhaps you might leverage domain screening and donor outreach, then utilize an employer appending service to help fill in any remaining gaps.

3. Screen donors and prospects for employers with matching gift programs.

Once you’ve located donor and alumni employment data, you can utilize the information to identify matching gift eligible donors. Here are a few best practices you can follow as you do so:

  • Check out top matching gift programs from well-known companies like these.
  • Emphasize companies that match gifts to colleges and universities.
  • Explore additional matching gift companies with a comprehensive database.

Studies show that more than 26 million individuals work for companies that offer some form of matching gift program. More than likely, that’s a significant portion of your school’s donors⁠—you just have to figure out which ones are eligible and where to go from there.

4. Communicate the value of matching gifts and higher education impact to donors.

Donors love participating in their employers’ gift-matching programs because the initiatives enable them to make a larger impact through their initial donations. Because this is one of the top motivating factors for participation, it’s a good idea to place a significant emphasis on doubled (and sometimes even tripled!) benefits that a matching gift can bring.

For example, let’s say a donor contributed $500 to provide 100 books for your newly built library. Be sure to highlight that, should that individual secure a match for their already-generous donation, they can essentially provide 200 books to make twice the impact⁠—all without having to reach back into their own wallets.

5. Follow up with donors on match-eligible gifts and provide employer-specific guidelines.

Your school’s online donation process should gather ample information about your donors as they complete the giving process⁠—including their employment status. After the transaction is complete, your fundraising team can (and should) leverage those collected insights in order to drive more matches to completion.

Picture this: Let’s say Donor Johnny entered his employer’s name in your donation page search tool, and you see that he works for the Home Depot. Afterward, you’ve collected that information, along with the data on the $1,000 gift that he made, to determine that his donation is matching gift eligible. But Johnny might not know that himself!

That’s why we recommend that you follow up with donors post-transaction to share whichever insights you’ve collected about their employers’ matching gift program availability. This should include minimum and maximum match amounts, match ratios, types of qualifying donors and organizations, and submission deadlines. And in order to really seal the deal, you can even equip donors with direct links to their employers’ matching program online submission forms!

6. Streamline your efforts with matching gifts and higher education software.

By adding a matching gift database like Double the Donation to your tech toolkit, you significantly boost your fundraising potential without putting a ton of added work on your team members’ plates. This fully automated matching gift platform identifies more match-eligible donors, automatically follows up with them, and even creates an automated match plan for you.

Not to mention, you can easily integrate Double the Donation’s matching gift automation tool⁠—360MatchPro⁠—across higher education fundraising channels such as GiveCampus, Anthology, Almabase, Ellucian, and more. Thanks to available matching gift and higher education software partnerships, institutions like yours can quickly raise more by adding company gift-matching functionality to their existing fundraising systems!

Take a look at these examples of using a matching gift tool to pinpoint companies that offer matching gifts to colleges and universities. Boost matching gifts and higher education!

Matching Gifts and Higher Education: Examples to Follow

Hundreds of schools and universities have successfully implemented these strategies to effectively promote matching gift fundraising opportunities to donors, alumni, and their overall communities. Let’s look at a few examples of how the right matching gift solutions can help boost your college’s funds!

Flagler College’s Dedicated Matching Gift Page

If alumni are looking for different ways to support their alma mater, well-designed matching gift pages can offer helpful information about multiplying their contributions. Check out this example of a dedicated matching gift page from Flagler College!

Some colleges and universities promote matching gifts and higher education companies on a dedicated matching gift webpage.

Flagler College’s web page provides alumni with instructions on how to obtain a matching donation from their employer. Plus, they’ve embedded the search tool and encouraged donors to look for more in-depth information about their employers’ matching gift programs. Not to mention, they offer vital contact information in case donors have additional questions.

Eckerd College’s Donation Form

Donation forms are another great way to start the conversation about matching gifts. At this stage, Eckerd College knows its users are ready to give and will be more motivated to multiply their contributions without reaching back into their own pockets.

Check out this example of this school’s donation form and how it promotes matching gifts:

Donation forms are a great place for colleges and universities to promote matching gifts and the companies that offer them.

In addition to the other donation options on the page, Eckerd College offers donors the chance to look into their employers’ matching gift programs with a searchable database tool (specifically through Double the Donation!).

University of Utah’s Ways to Give Page

Many institutions have a Ways to Give page on their website—the University of Utah being one of them. In order to drive fundraising efforts, this school includes different donation methods (e.g. online with a credit card or through the mail) through which donors can contribute. And the University of Utah also knows that its Ways to Give page is a key location to promote corporate matching gift programs!

Here’s what this school’s Ways to Give page looks like:

Some higher education institutions promote matching gifts on their Ways to Give pages to elevate their matching gifts and higher education strategies simultaneously.

This school not only shares general information about matching gift programs but also provides donors with Double the Donation’s embedded search tool to learn more about their specific employer’s gift matching policies. The more ways a donor or prospect knows to support your institution (including corporate gift-matching), the more likely they are to follow through with the process!


Matching gifts are a valuable resource, so ensure that your institution is taking advantage of all available revenue. In fact, the colleges and universities that have the most matching gift success incorporate matching gifts throughout their broader fundraising efforts. It won’t take much, but, as you can see from the corporate guidelines sampled above, a little goes a long way with matching gifts.

This list, while helpful, doesn’t come close to covering all matching gift opportunities. Rather, it’s a sampling of well-known companies with matching gift programs. While these major companies do offer generous matching gift programs for educational institutions, they aren’t the only companies that do. Make sure to stay up-to-date with your donors’ employers. That way, you can maximize your revenue potential!

Interested in learning more about matching gifts for colleges and universities? Check out these educational resources:

  • Top Matching Gift Companies. For more matching gift companies (most of which match gifts to higher educational institutions), go over this list of some standout opportunities. Then, see if your alumni or donors work for these businesses!
  • 12 School & Higher Ed Fundraising Platforms That Grow Matching Gifts. Looking for top software that will help you grow matching gifts and higher education fundraising efforts? Check out our list of twelve fantastic solutions.
  • Marketing Matching Gifts. Learn how to promote matching gifts for higher education with this Double the Donation guide. Ensure your school doesn’t miss out on revenue opportunities by incorporating these practices.

Matching gifts and higher education can benefit from Double the Donation's software.

Check out these Atlanta matching gift companies to find corporate philanthropy opportunities for your nonprofit.

7 Major Atlanta Companies with Matching Gift Programs

While Double the Donation works with nonprofits across the country, the fact that we’re headquartered in Atlanta means we have a special place in our hearts for Atlanta nonprofits.

Through corporate giving programs, nonprofit supporters can double (maybe even triple!) their contributions to eligible organizations, allowing their employers to showcase their social responsibility. These programs boost nonprofits toward their goals by contributing much-deserved revenue. Your organization does not want to overlook these opportunities.

If your nonprofit is based in Atlanta, brush up on these important areas of corporate giving:

  1. Statistics on Atlanta Matching Gift Companies.
  2. Companies in Atlanta with Matching Gift Programs.
  3. Exploring Revenue Opportunities with a Matching Gift Database.

Ready to boost your nonprofit’s revenue by learning about corporate giving opportunities in your area? Let’s get started!

Statistics on Atlanta Matching Gift Companies

From a nonprofit’s standpoint, being located in a major city like Atlanta is ideal for raising money with corporate giving programs. The city is home to many of the largest employers in the world, some of which offer extensive employee matching gift and volunteer grant programs. Here are a few statistics on Atlanta-based companies and their employee giving programs which may interest you:

  • Atlanta ranks 4th, just behind New York City, Houston, and Dallas, in the number of Fortune 500 companies headquartered within city boundaries.
  • 4 Fortune 100 companies call Atlanta home. This includes Coca-Cola, Home Depot, United Parcel Service (UPS), and Delta Air Lines.
  • 26 Fortune 1,000 companies are headquartered in Atlanta, 16 of which are in the Fortune 500.
  • 75% of Fortune 1000 companies have employees in the Atlanta market.
  • 65% of Fortune 500 companies match donations made by their employees.
  • 40% of Fortune 500 companies offer volunteer grants for employees.

Curious about employee matching gift programs and volunteer grant programs? Click here to explore more corporate philanthropy statistics.

Otherwise, let’s dive into some major companies that offer matching gifts in the Atlanta area!
Take a look at these Atlanta matching gift companies that are known nationwide.

Companies in Atlanta, GA with Matching Gift Programs

With over 75% of Fortune 1000 companies having a presence in Atlanta, there are definitely opportunities for your nonprofit to increase fundraising from employee giving programs. A great place to start is by looking at the largest companies based in Atlanta.

Let’s take a look at a few of the employee giving programs at some of Atlanta’s leading employers.

Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola is an Atlanta matching gift companies that matches employee donations at a 2:1 ratio.

Coca-Cola offers a very generous employee giving program. The company offers a 2:1 match, which means eligible employee donations are tripled! They’ll match donations anywhere from $25 to $20,000, as long as they’re made to eligible nonprofits.

Coke is willing to match donations to nearly all nonprofits but does have a few restrictions on their matching gift program. For instance, part-time employees are ineligible to participate.

Another aspect of Coca-Cola’s program worth mentioning is that the company does a great job promoting the programs to Coke employees! Read more about this in our previous article that covers employee matching gift participation rates at various companies across the nation.

Click here for additional info on Coke’s matching gift program.

Home Depot

Home Depot, an Atlanta matching gift company, matches donations anywhere from $25 to $3,000.

As one of the major companies based in Atlanta, Home Depot is also a generous supporter of nonprofits in the city. They match donations anywhere from $25 to $3,000 at a 1:1 ratio.

Similar to Coca-Cola, the company has few restrictions in place. For instance, both full-time and part-time employees are eligible, but unlike some other major companies, retired employees are ineligible.

The company has an easy-to-use electronic matching gift submission process, which means your donors can submit matching gift requests in a matter of minutes.

If you’re interested in learning more about the typical process a donor goes through to submit a matching gift request electronically, learn more about Home Depot’s electronic submission process.

Click here for additional info on Home Depot’s matching gift program.

IBM

IBM matches donations made by both current employees and retirees.IBM is an Atlanta matching gift company that matches donations with either monetary and equipment grants.

The matching gift ratio varies depending upon whether it’s an employee or retiree making the donation. For instance, IBM will match eligible contributions of up to $5,000 per institution per current employee at a 1:1 ratio. For retired employees, they’ll match at a .5:1 ratio.

Plus, they provide volunteer grants for employees and retirees who prefer to donate their time rather than money. They offer both individual and team volunteer grants. Depending on the amount of volunteered hours, employees can request from $500 to $5,000, starting at 40 hours.

Charitable employees who volunteer for eligible organizations can request either a monetary grant or an equipment grant. Specifically, team volunteer grant requests for eligible schools and nonprofits can be up to $7,500 in equipment. For individuals volunteer grant requests, IBM employees and retirees can request up to $3,500 in technology grants or $1,000 in cash awards each year.

Click here for additional info on IBM’s matching gift program.

Delta Air Lines

Delta Air Lines matches employee donations up to $5,000.Delta matches employee donations to a wide range of educational institutions, including those that are both public and private. Plus, they make the match request process simpler through electronic forms.

Delta matches up to $5,000 annually per eligible individual at a dollar-for-dollar rate. This is up from a 50% match on up to $2,000 annually just a few years ago.

The program is offered to full-time employees, part-time employees, and retirees.

Click here for additional info on Delta Air Lines’ matching gift program.

AT&T

AT&T, an Atlanta matching gift company, offers a Cause Cards program as a way to match donations.AT&T is the largest provider of mobile and fixed telephone systems in the United States. As of 2018, it’s the ninth-largest company in the U.S. by total revenue.

While AT&T doesn’t offer a matching gift program, the company supports organizations that full-time employees are passionate about through its Cause Cards program.

Cause Cards are grants from AT&T given to eligible charities recommended by employees. All employees that participate in the annual Employee Giving Campaign are eligible to receive a Cause Card.

The grant amount depends on each individual employee’s total giving amount. These Cause Cards are expected to range from $25 to $250, and once they’re approved, employees are notified of the amount offered by AT&T and the deadline to select an eligible charity.

Click here for additional info on AT&T’s matching gift program.

United Parcel Service (UPS)

UPS, which was originally an Atlanta matching gift company, no longer offers a match program.We get more questions from our nonprofit clients asking us about UPS’s matching gift program than any other company. Unfortunately, this confusion arises from the fact that UPS is still listed on the majority of the random lists of matching gift companies found on various websites.

UPS does not offer an employee matching gift program. Upon hearing this news, our team reached out to the UPS Foundation for confirmation and received the following response:

“The UPS Foundation formerly offered a gift matching program for educational and cultural organizations. However, on February 20, 2009, UPS’s Board of Trustees approved the action to suspend the Gift Matching Program due to the economic climate. At this time, there are no current plans to restart the program.”

While they don’t match employee donations, they are avid supporters of their local communities. For instance, in recent years, they’ve invested over 1.8 million volunteer hours and over $100 million to charitable organizations.

Equifax

Equifax, an Atlanta matching gift company, matches donations from $50 to $5,000.Equifax matches employee donations to nearly all 501(c)(3) organizations. While the company provided us with a paper matching gift form copy, we always encourage employees to check the company intranet to ensure it’s the most up-to-date version.

Both full-time and part-time employees are eligible to participate in the program. Donations of $50 to $5,000 may be matched at a 1:1 ratio. In other words, donations to eligible nonprofits can potentially be doubled!

As with many corporate giving programs, Equifax aims to enable employees to use a part of the company’s budget to support their own philanthropic interests.

Click here for additional info on Equifax’s matching gift program.

Additional Atlanta Matching Gift Companies

Hundreds of other major employers in the Atlanta area also match employee donations. Check out some other Fortune 1,000 companies in Atlanta that offer matching gift programs:

  1. Southern Company
  2. Truist Bank
  3. First Data Corporation
  4. Pulte Group
  5. Aaron’s, Inc.
  6. Carter’s, Inc.
  7. Global Payments, Inc.

By familiarizing yourself with employers who offer corporate giving programs, you set yourself up for a successful fundraising strategy. Otherwise, you may miss out on important revenue opportunities.
A matching gift database can help your nonprofit pinpoint Atlanta matching gift companies.

Exploring Opportunities with a Matching Gift Database

By adding a matching gift database (like Double the Donation) to your nonprofit’s tech toolbox, you’ll substantially increase your revenue potential.

Double the Donation’s database has data on more than 20,000 companies that represent 15+ million match-eligible individuals, making it the world’s leading matching gift database. Here’s how it works:

  1. You embed the search tool across your fundraising channels (e.g. your website and donation webpage).
  2. Donors/Volunteers search for their employers.
  3. Your supporters instantly receive updated info on their employers’ giving programs.

Larger nonprofits may benefit even more from 360MatchPro by Double the Donation. It recognizes match-eligible donors through email domain screening and enables email automation to drive matches to completion.

Want to find out how these tools can help your Atlanta nonprofit increase its fundraising potential?


Atlanta is home to many of the nation’s leading companies that match employee donations. Make sure everyone in your organization is familiar with major employers that offer giving programs in your area.

At the very least, your organization should share the above companies with both your team and your supporters. Making sure they’re familiar with these major companies can help your organization boost its revenue.

You should also consider taking it a step further by providing donors and volunteers with detailed information on their company / their spouse’s employer. By raising awareness and simplifying the match process for supporters, you should increase your fundraising revenue.

Take a tour of Double the Donation’s matching gift service to see if we can help your organization raise more money from these programs.

Learn about fundraising match programs and the top companies that offer them.

Matching Gifts for Run/Walk/Ride Events: Top 5 Companies

At Double the Donation, we often discuss matching gift programs, or those through which employers match the donations made by their employees to qualifying nonprofits. However, did you know that many national (and even international) companies also offer fundraising match programs?

These opportunities are a bit different than the traditional matching gift programs, and depending on the type of fundraising your nonprofit partakes in, you might be missing out on them!

Fundraising match programs also involve employer matching. However, unlike matching gift programs that solely cover financial donations made from an employee’s own bank account, fundraising match programs involve a company matching all of the funds raised by an employee during a fundraising activity.

This is particularly important to consider in regards to one of the most popular fundraisers in the nonprofit world: The Run/Walk/Ride event. 

These events involve participant donors running/walking/cycling a certain distance and collecting pledged donations from their personal networks corresponding to that distance. Those pledged donations benefit your nonprofit and the farther a participant exercises, the more they raise!

However, for donors that work for a company offering fundraising matching, these pledged donations can be doubled. We’re going to discuss the following five companies with fundraising match programs:

  • Intuit, Inc.
  • McAfee, Inc.
  • BP
  • State Street Corporation
  • Penguin Random House

Before diving into the above companies, however, we’re going to look at the easiest way to discover these opportunities– with dedicated matching gift tools.

Matching gift tools are the best way to discover these programs.

The Best Way to Discover Matching Gifts

To capitalize on these fundraising matching programs, you first need to discover where they exist. The easiest way to do that is by using dedicated matching gift tools.

Matching gift tools allow your organization to discover where these opportunities exist and pursue them if so. For example, 360MatchPro is a fully automated matching gift tool that automatically searches a donor’s eligibility once a donation is made. If eligible, information regarding how to submit a match request is sent to the donor as well.

With that, check out these top 5 companies that offer fundraising match programs.

These are some of the top companies offering fundraising match programs.

Companies that Match Gifts to Run/Walk/Ride Events

Intuit, Inc.Intuit is a top company offering a fundraising match program.

Intuit is a software company that develops financial and tax preparation software. It has 8,500 employees and offers a comprehensive matching gift program to its employees.

Intuit’s matching gift program includes an individual match, in which the company will match an employee’s donation of up to $2,000 to a nonprofit organization or educational institution of their choosing. In addition, Intuit’s corporate giving programs include a fundraising match. Intuit matches all of the money personally raised by an employee for a fundraising event.

There is a combined $2,000 maximum match (for both individual and fundraising matches) per employee every year.

Learn more about Intuit’s matching gift program.

McAfee, Inc.McAfee is a top company that offers a fundraising match program.

McAfee, the world’s largest security technology company, is a computer security software organization located in California that was recently acquired by Intel.

McAfee offers both individual matches (at a 1:1 ratio), and fundraising matches (also at a 1:1 ratio).

There is a combined $1,000 company matching limit per employee.

Learn more about McAfee’s matching gift program.

British Petroleum (BP)BP is a top company that offers a fundraising match program.

BP, the fifth-largest company in the world by revenue, is an international oil and gas company headquartered in London.  BP employs nearly 80,000 people across the world with a large presence in the United States.

BP’s employee grant programs include the traditional personal donation matches, as well as matches for money raised from employees’ friends and family members. BP will match a maximum of $5,000 per employee, per year.

Learn more about British Petroleum’s matching gift program.

State Street CorporationState Street Corporation is a top company that offers a fundraising match program.

State Street is a financial services holding company that was founded back in 1792 in Boston. After many years of successful growth, the company now employs more than 30,000 people internationally.

State Street offers a matching gift program for employee donations called GiveMore, which matches at a 1:1 ratio. Within this program, annual matching limits are extremely generous but also vary by role:

  • Board of Directors, CEO, President and Vice Chairs can receive up to $35,000 in matching funds.
  • Executive Vice Presidents can receive up to $25,000.
  • Senior Vice Presidents can receive up to $15,000.
  • All other employees can receive up to $5,000 in matching funds.

State Street also offers a fundraising match program called CollectMore, where the company will match an employee’s fulfilled fundraising pledges. Limits in the CollectMore program are lower, but nonetheless, being able to have funds matched is an incredible benefit for employees participating in a fundraising walk, bike, or ride type of event.

Learn more about State Street’s matching gift program.

Penguin Random HousePenguin Random House is a top company offering a fundraising match program.

Penguin Random House matches employee donations of up to $2,500 per employee per year to most 501(c)(3) nonprofits.

To sweeten their program even further, Penguin Random House has a Fundraising Match Program where the company will match up to $1,500 per employee (included in the $2,500 per employee annual maximum), per calendar year, for money raised personally by employees for fundraising events to qualifying nonprofit organizations with 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status.

Types of fundraising events include, but are not limited to, walk-a-thons, bike-a-thons, and 5K’s to name a few. Each fundraising request will be considered on a case by case basis.

Learn more about Penguin Random House’s matching gift program.


Fundraising match programs are the perfect addition to any Run/Walk/Ride event.

If you’re planning such an event, check to see if any of your donors work for the above companies. If any of your participants are match-eligible, you can receive twice the fundraised donations for that participant!