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Learn the difference between paper and electronic matching gift forms.

Matching Gift Forms: Key Components of Corporate Match Forms

Years ago, all companies required employees to submit match requests using paper forms. While they’re still offered at some companies, more and more companies are transitioning to electronic matching gift forms.

As one of the main sources of revenue for nonprofits, matching gifts are not something your organization wants to miss out on. Instead of sticking strictly to paper forms, offer your donors (and their employers) a digital option, too!

Feel free to jump ahead and read the section that’s most pertinent to your organization:

  1. Paper Matching Gift Forms
  2. Electronic Matching Gift Forms
  3. How a Matching Gift Database Can Help

Read on to learn more about the different components of both paper and electronic match forms. As you move forward, implement these best practices in your fundraising strategy. Give your donors all the tools they need to complete a match request, and you’ll maximize your matching gift revenue. Let’s get started!
Although paper forms are used less frequently, its vital your organization understands these matching gift forms.

Paper Matching Gift Forms

Paper matching gift forms are where it all started. While most of your donors may prefer electronic forms, you’ll miss out on a substantial amount of revenue if you don’t incorporate traditional paper forms.

There are a few specific components of paper forms that your organization should be aware of when designing and distributing them to your donors.
There are different elements to paper matching gift forms.

Common Components of Paper Match Forms

Donor Section

This is where the company asks employees to provide details on the original donation. This typically includes:

  • Employee identification numbers.
  • Personal information such as a mailing address and phone number.
  • Donation amount.

Without this information, a company won’t be able to determine your organization’s eligibility, which invalidates the donor’s match request.

Nonprofit Section

On these forms, there will be specific questions pertaining to the organization. Your donor will also need to provide documentation of their donation, which requires your nonprofit to create some sort of tangible proof.

Your donor will also need to provide any other relevant information that’s requested on the form. Typical information fields listed here are:

  • The recipient organization’s name.
  • The type of organization (e.g. cultural, educational).
  • Donation date.

If the company doesn’t receive this information, they won’t be able to determine your eligibility, which means there’s no possibility of receiving a match.

View an example of a company that requires paper forms by taking a look at Norfolk Southern’s matching gift program.
There are a few common steps for submitting paper matching gift forms.

Typical Steps for Donors Submitting a Paper Match Form

Employees at corporations with paper match forms go through the following steps to submit their match requests:

  1. Make a donation.
  2. Determine if their company matches employee gifts.
  3. Determine if the recipient organization is eligible.
  4. Locate and submit the appropriate matching gift form via the designated channel (e.g. mail).

While paper forms are being used less now that society is more tech-reliant, it’s still important that your nonprofit’s team knows about the basics. That way, they can answer any questions your donors may have about submitting a paper match application.

Explore Double the Donation’s service to see how we help donors determine their matching gift eligibility and make it easy for them to submit match requests.
Your nonprofit should fully understand electronic matching gift forms, too.

Electronic Matching Gift Forms

Technology is rapidly progressing, so it makes sense that many companies have transitioned to electronic forms. Doing so not only reduces their costs in the long-run, but it also makes it easier for employees to submit match requests instantly from anywhere.

While paper forms are wonderful to have, electronic forms give your donors a bit more freedom in when and where they complete their requests. Plus, digital forms save you time by allowing the data to flow directly into your matching gift database, as well as a decent chunk of money, since you won’t have to print them off.

Before incorporating them into your fundraising strategy, learn the common components of electronic forms, so you can relay this information to your donors.
There are a few common components of electronic matching gift forms.

Common Components of Paper Match Forms

Employee Sign In / Registration

To access their companies’ electronic matching gift forms, employees usually have to sign on using their standard username and password.

If retirees are eligible to request a match through their former employer, they typically must register in order to use the system. This is often done through a third party company such as the JK-Group or Causecast. The process from here is fairly straightforward.

Employee Submission

Just like paper forms, employees go through the process of registering their match requests. This typically includes:

  1. Finding the nonprofit organization on the list of IRS 501(c)(3) organizations.
  2. Providing information about their previous donation such as the amount and date of the donation.
  3. Submitting their matching gift requests.

It may be difficult to encourage donors to complete the match request process, but keep trying (or enlist the help of a matching gift automation system). Otherwise, there’s no chance of you receiving that much-deserved revenue!

Nonprofit Verification

While the most challenging part of receiving matching gift funds is getting donors to initiate and complete the matching gift process, don’t forget that your nonprofit also plays a role. Verification is a vital step in the electronic form process.

After the employee completes the matching gift request, the nonprofit is normally notified by mail that an employee requested a match. At this point, the nonprofit must log into the company’s online verification system to confirm that the employee actually made a donation to the organization. Nonprofits may also be asked to send a letter verifying their 501(c)(3) status.

Whatever you do, do not forget to verify the gift. This is the final step before receiving a check, and the last thing you want is to slip up and miss out on the match!
Check out these electronic matching gift form examples.

Examples of Companies Utilizing Electronic Matching Gift Forms

Wondering exactly what the online matching gift process is like for your organization’s donors? Here are two articles to give you a sense of what the process looks like:

Home Depot’s Matching Gift Process Sample

Like many other businesses, Home Depot requires match forms to be filled out electronically or by phone. Electronic forms allow for easier documentation and speed up the match process.

See a demo of Home Depot’s process.

Capital One Matching Gift Process Sample

Like Boeing, Texas Instruments, and many other companies, Capital One employees utilize CyberGrants’ matching gift platform. Employees go through the process which is integrated into Capital One’s intranet.

See a demo of Capital One’s process.


A comprehensive database can help you better understand matching gift forms.

How a Matching Gift Database Can Help

At Double the Donation, we provide a summary of each company’s matching gift program to make it easy for donors to go through the process. Of course, companies have far more detailed guidelines with all sorts of fine print detailing how the program works, but this is a wonderful starting place and can give you and your donors major insight to corporate giving opportunities.

It’s up to your organization to find out all the guidelines, but Double the Donation’s matching gift database can simplify this process.

When your donors search their employers using the tool, they’ll instantly receive any available guidelines for submitting a match request to their employer. They can do this before they even submit their donation to ensure that it will be eligible.

If available, a link to online forms and other related documents will be given to them, too! Here’s an example of what you might see when searching an employer with Double the Donation’s matching gift tool:
Donors will instantly know if their employer offers matching gifts and will be given any available forms.

Donors will also see other relevant information, such as:

  • Minimum and maximum match amounts.
  • The company’s match ratio.
  • Eligibility/Nonprofit requirements.
  • Submission processes (whether online or offline).
  • Submission deadlines.
  • Whether or not there’s a volunteer grant program.

A database can give you powerful insight into your donors’ employers. Make sure you’re not missing out on these important revenue opportunities by providing your donors with all the information (i.e. guidelines and forms) they need!


Make sure you’re prepared to guide donors through the match submission process. Your team should understand the ins and outs of both paper and electronic match forms, so you’ll be able to answer any questions your donors may have.

Now that you know all about both types of forms, get out there and start maximizing your matching gift revenue!

Small Companies Matching Gifts

10 Additional Companies Providing Grants of Greater than 15 Dollars per Employee Volunteer Hour (Part 2)

Volunteer Grants (aka Dollars for Doers) programs are an up and coming form of corporate giving. Unlike matching gift programs, in which corporations match donations from employees, these programs match volunteer effort from employees with corporate donations.

If you haven’t been following Double the Donation’s blog, catch up on part 1 of this topic where we introduced 10 companies which provide grants of at least $15 per volunteer hour.

Due to the positive feedback we received from readers, we’re doing a followup post. So without further ado, here are 10 additional companies which have truly embraced Dollars for Doers programs with generous grants per hour volunteered.

Companies with Volunteer Grants Greater than $15 per hour:

Travelers CompanyTravelers Offers Multiple Types of Employee Donation Programs

Travelers offers two types of employee giving programs.

  1. Matching Gifts of Money
  2. Matching Gifts of Time

Through the “Matching Gifts of Money” program, the company doubles donations made by employees to nearly all nonprofits.

Through the “Matching Gifts of Time” program, the company directs a $500 grant to nonprofit organizations when an employee has volunteered for at least 24 hours with the organization ($20 per hour).

View additional details on Travelers Company’s volunteer grant program.

Macy’sMacy's Employees can Have their Donations Doubled and are Rewarded with Grants for Volunteering

Whereas most companies apply very few restrictions to their volunteer grant programs, Macy’s only provides volunteer grants to educational institutions (including K-12). Through Macy’s “Earnings for Learnings” program, the company provides a $250 grant to schools where employees volunteer for at least 15 hours ($17 per hour).

Macy’s also offers a very generous matching gift program where the company will match each employee’s donations up to $22,500 annually to nearly all nonprofits.

View additional details on Macy’s volunteer grant program.

Kimberly-ClarkEmployee Giving Programs at Kimberly Clark

While Johnson & Johnson made our 2012 ranking of top corporate employee giving programs, Kimberly-Clark isn’t far behind. The company matches donations to nearly all nonprofits up to $10,000 per employee per year.

The Kimberly-Clark Foundation also recognizes the volunteer efforts of employees and their spouses or domestic partners. The company provides $500 grants to nonprofits where employees / spouses / domestic partners volunteer for at least 30 hours in a year ($17 per hour).

View additional details on Kimberly-Clark’s volunteer grant program.

PNC FinancialPNC's Grants for Great Hours

Through PNC’s “Grants for Great Hours” volunteer grant program, employees who volunteer for 40+ hours with a nonprofit early education program earn a grant of $1,000 for that organization ($25 per hour).

Additionally, PNC offers a less restrictive matching gift program where the company matches donations dollar for dollar to nearly every nonprofit and school.

View additional details on PNC Financial’s volunteer grant program.

AmgenAmgen Matching and Volunteering Grants

The Amgen Foundation supports volunteer efforts by providing grants to organizations where employees volunteer. Once an Amgen employee volunteers for 15 hours in a year with a nonprofit, he or she can request a $500 grant ($33 per hour).

Full time employees are eligible for up to $2,000 annually in grants for their nonprofit while part time staff can earn up to $1,000 in grants annually.

Amgen also matches employee contributions of up to $20,000 per employee annually to nearly all nonprofits.

View additional details on Amgen’s volunteer grant program.

PPG IndustriesPPG Grants for Employees and Retirees

PPG Industries offers one of the most generous volunteer grant programs. Through PPG’s “Grant Incentives for Volunteerism by PPG Employees & Retirees (GIVE)” program, after an employee or retiree volunteers for 10 hours with a nonprofit organization, he or she can request a $500 grant for the organization ($50 per hour).

As an added bonus, if an individual also serves on the nonprofit’s board of directors; the company will double the grant and award $1,000 to the nonprofit ($100 per volunteer hour).

PPG Industries also matches donations to select organizations.

View additional details on PPG Industries’ volunteer grant program.

Devon EnergyGrants when Devon Energy Employees Volunteer

Whereas most companies base their volunteer grants off the annual number of hours volunteered, Devon Energy provides grants for regular volunteering during shorter time periods.  The company offers two ways employees can request $250 grants ($20 per hour) for their organization:

  1. Six hours of volunteering per month for two months.
  2. Three hours of volunteering per month for four months.

View additional details on Devon Energy’s volunteer grant program.

Soros Fund ManagementGrant Programs at Soros Fund Management

Soros was recently recognized on our list of companies with the top employee giving programs. The company provides volunteer grants of $50 per hour up to $4,000 annually.

Additionally, the company is one of the many employers which triple or quadruple employee donations.

View additional details on Soros Fund Management’s volunteer grant program.

Chevron CorporationChevron's Grant for Good

Through Chevron’s “Grant for Good” program, the company provides grants as a way to recognize employees and volunteers who volunteer on a regular basis.

After employees volunteer for 20 hours with a single nonprofit, the organization can receive a $500 grant. Each employee or retiree is eligible to obtain two $500 grants per calendar year for either a single nonprofit or two different nonprofits.

Chevron also doubles donations made by employees and retirees through the company’s Humankind Program.

View additional details on Chevron’s volunteer grant program.

PfizerEmployee Grant Programs at Pfizer

Pfizer encourages regular volunteerism among employees and retirees. The company provides $1,000 volunteer grants to organizations where employees volunteer on a regular basis.

After an employee or retiree volunteers for six hours per month for six consecutive months, he or she can submit a request for a $1,000 volunteer grant.

The company also matches donations made by employees and retirees up to $5,000 annually.

View additional details on Pfizer’s volunteer grant program.

Utilizing Resources:

Tour Double the DonationAll of these companies have embraced employee giving programs by offering grants above and beyond corporate averages. While the corporations may benefit from increased employee engagement, your nonprofit can also reap rewards.

These Dollar for Doer programs are a chance to double dip. Earn monetary grants along with benefiting from the assistance volunteers can provide. Make sure your nonprofit is encouraging volunteers to log their volunteer hours and submit these grants to their employers.

Tour Double the Donation to see how we help nonprofits raise more money from Dollar for Doer and matching gift programs.