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If you're looking to raise money online, checkout these 10 fundraising ideas for nonprofits.

11 Online Fundraising Ideas: Raise Money in the Digital Age!

We all know that online fundraising is quickly taking the nonprofit world by storm. More people than ever are making their charitable contributions via online avenues. That’s why we’ve compiled 11 of the best online fundraising ideas that can help your nonprofit raise more money in the digital age!

Here’s what we’ll be covering:

  1. Crowdfunding
  2. Peer-to-Peer Fundraising
  3. Matching Gift Drive
  4. T-Shirt Fundraising
  5. Online Donation Forms
  6. Online Giving Days
  7. Text-to-Give Campaign
  8. Viral Fundraising Campaign
  9. Online Cashback Websites
  10. Online Auctions
  11. Donation for a Vote

Let’s take a look at each of these online fundraising ideas in more detail.

Crowdfunding is an online fundraising idea that uses social sharing to raise money and awareness.

1. Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding is proving to be one of the most popular ways for nonprofits and individuals alike to raise money for causes, projects, or events that they care about.

For those new to the term, crowdfunding essentially makes use of a nonprofit’s or individual’s existing network of supporters, friends, family members, coworkers, peers, and even acquaintances.

Nonprofits and individuals can set up crowdfunding pages and then share those pages on social media sites and via email.

A typical nonprofit crowdfunding page looks like this:

Fundly's crowdfunding pages make online fundraising quick and simple.

Most crowdfunding platforms allow nonprofits to:

  • Upload images and videos.
  • Write a detailed description.
  • Post updates and comments.
  • Share the campaign across social media sites and email.
  • Set up giving levels or tiers.
  • Send out automatic acknowledgements to donors.
  • Track metrics like number of donors, average donation amount, and total amount raised.

If you want to make the most of your nonprofit’s crowdfunding campaign, follow these best practices:

  1. Interact with your supporters: Your donors want to know how your online fundraising campaign is going! Keep them in the loop by posting updates and responding to their comments on your crowdfunding page.
  2. Post at least 4 photos or videos: Media gives your donors some context and allows them to see exactly what they’re donating to. Make sure that your photos look professional and highlight the people, animals, or communities that your nonprofit serves.
  3. Set up giving levels: Including donation tiers or giving levels on your campaign page allows donors to select the one that they prefer. To create an even bigger impact, you can list out the specific actions that your nonprofit can accomplish with each donation amount.

Main Takeaway: Crowdfunding is one of the best online fundraising ideas for nonprofits. Most crowdfunding platforms enable you to get up and running in just a few minutes, and you can start raising money from your supporters in no time!

Bonus: Start your crowdfunding campaign today!

Peer-to-peer fundraising is an online fundraising idea that uses supporters to fundraise on your behalf.

2. Peer-to-Peer Fundraising

Peer-to-peer fundraising is a type of crowdfunding that many nonprofits pair with fundraising events like walkathons, marathons, and cycling events.

Peer-to-peer fundraising campaigns typically follow this structure:

  1. A nonprofit sets a goal, determines a timeline, and plans a peer-to-peer event.
  2. The nonprofit reaches out to loyal supporters and asks them if they want to participate in the fundraiser.
  3. If supporters are willing to participate, they then set up their own online fundraising pages (with the nonprofit’s help). These individual pages link up to the nonprofit’s main peer-to-peer fundraising page.
  4. Individuals reach out to their networks to ask for donations on the nonprofit’s behalf.
  5. Supporters’ friends and family members make donations via the individual’s peer-to-peer fundraising page.
  6. The nonprofit collects the donations, acknowledges and thanks supporters and donors, and hosts the (typically active) event.

Here’s an example of an individual’s peer-to-peer fundraising page:

Create a peer-to-peer page as an online fundraising idea.

This individual peer-to-peer fundraising page is linked to the nonprofit’s primary fundraising page:

Here is an example of an online fundraising idea using a peer-to-peer platform.

This peer-to-peer campaign follows a few best practices that we’re a huge fan of:

  1. They include several images: Both the nonprofit’s main page and the individual’s campaign page have images and videos that allow supporters to see exactly what their donations are going toward.
  2. They describe what the contributions will help accomplish: Each page highlights the need for homes and volunteer time in Austin. Both pages have giving tiers that describe what a donation amount will be able to buy. For example, $300 will buy a stove, while $500 will buy a roof.
  3. Each description is detailed: A good peer-to-peer campaign description is the key to encouraging people to donate to your cause. Without it, people won’t know why you’re raising money! This campaign has listed out the reasons for fundraising and lets people know why building homes in Austin is important.

Main Takeaway: Peer-to-peer fundraising is a type of online fundraising that enables your nonprofit to raise more money and acquire more donors. As your supporters reach out to their networks, your nonprofit can introduce more people to your cause and mission.

Bonus: Check out the top 15 peer-to-peer fundraising platforms for nonprofits!

Organizations can hold matching gift drives to double the impact of their supporters.

3. Matching Gift Drive

Take online giving days one step further. Ask a local company or major donor to match donations made on a particular day to double the amount you raise.

Time sensitive fundraisers work well because they create urgency, a good motivator for supporters. Plus, since each donation goes twice as far, donors will be more likely to participate.

Unlike with corporate matching gift programs that apply only to employees, matching gift drives don’t have restrictions on who can participate!

The key to a prosperous campaign is promotion. Get the most people to participate by posting the details on your social media accounts on the days leading up the event. Don’t forget to mention the business (or major donor) that’s matching all the gifts!

Also, let donors know about the many ways they can contribute. Provide your donors convenient ways to give, such as:

  • Donation pages.
  • Text-to-give.
  • Mobile-responsive forms.
  • Crowdfunding pages.

The more fundraising options donors have, the more likely they are to make a donation.

Think about it this way: if you’re hosting a giving day, but only accept donations through a form on your website, this limits the number of people that can contribute to your cause. 

If donors encounter your marketing while browsing on their phones, they’ll want a way to donate with that same device. If your form is confusing or hard to read, donors may reconsider donating to your organization.

With that said, make sure that you have a variety of ways to collect donations before launching your matching gift drive.

Main Takeaway: Knowing that their gifts will double for a limited time is a great motivator for donors. Use that knowledge to your advantage and host a matching gift drive.

Bonus:  For matching gifts year-round, see how Mercy Corps helps their supporters determine if their employer matches donations on their branded matching gifts page from Double the Donation.

Another online fundraising idea is a t-shirt fundraiser.

4. T-Shirt Fundraising

Another effective way for nonprofits to fundraise online is by selling t-shirts. Your nonprofit can deisgn t-shirts as merchandise for your organization and sell them online to your supporters.

T-shirt fundraisers are a fun, engaging way to raise money for your nonprofit because they allow supporters to show their love for your organization while still getting something back in return.

For supporters who many not be able to donate as much as they would like due to financial limitations, t-shirt fundraisers offer them the opportunity to contribute to your cause without breaking the bank.

Your nonprofit can get started by promoting t-shirt sales in conjunction with different fundraising campaigns. For example, you might sell holiday-themed t-shirts during year-end giving to capitalize on the seasonal spirit.

Even further, the t-shirts you sell can double as marketing materials for your nonprofit’s brand. When people see their friends wearing your organization’s shirts, they may get inspired to start contributing to your nonprofit.

Bonfire enables nonprofits to hold t-shirt fundraisers to raise money.

When choosing an online host for your t-shirt fundraising initiative, select one that:

  • Offers plenty of t-shirt customization options.
  • Allows you to upload original designs for your shirts.
  • Gives you the freedom to set your own t-shirt prices.
  • Charges a low-overhead fee so you can keep more of your profits.
  • Gives you the ability to customize your nonprofit’s t-shirt sales page.

As your organization starts selling t-shirts, remember that customization is key! Supporters are more likely to buy your organization’s shirts if they feel the product (and sales process) reflects the brand they have come to know and love.

Bonus: Learn more about selling t-shirts to raise money for your nonprofit with Bonfire!

 


Organizations should accept donations through online fundraising forms.

5. Online Donation Forms

One of the most traditional ways to raise money online is through the tried-and-true online donation form. In many cases, donation forms allow you to brand your page and create special fields to capture specific, related information.

Best of all, online donation forms can be mobile-friendly so even more of your supporters have access. 

Since there are many customization capabilities available, your organization can create a form that is completely unique to your brand.

Here is an example of what your online donation form could look like:

Your nonprofit can use online fundraising ideas like branded donation forms.

As you can see, the Water Project does a lot of great things with their donation form:

  • First, the donation form has preset giving buttons, making it easy for the donor to choose a gift amount.
  • Secondly, donors have the option to set recurring gifts.
  • Last, the option to share contributions on Facebook and Twitter is predominantly displayed.

All these features not only help boost your awareness and funds, but they also make the giving process convenient for your donors.

Of course, if your organization wants all of these features (and more!), you’ll have to chose an excellent fundraising software provider.

Look for a vendor that has a responsive technical support team and an easy-to-use interface; you shouldn’t have to be an expert in CSS and HTML to create a professional-looking form.

With a simple donation form builder, your organization should be able to drag and drop the elements you want to use and customize them to fit your needs.

When creating your online donation forms, be considerate of your donors’ time and keep your donations quick and simple.

Main Takeaway: Creating a convenient and beautifully designed donation page starts with finding the right software. Find a provider that offers the features that will make donating quick and easy.

Bonus: One convenient way to give online is via text-to-donate software. Visit MobileCause to learn more about giving on the go with text-to-donate tools!

A great fundraising idea for nonprofits is holding an online giving day.

6. Online Giving Days

The most common online giving day is #GivingTuesday, a national day of charitable giving started a few years ago by the 92nd Street Y in New York.

While your nonprofit might already participate in #GivingTuesday, that doesn’t mean that you can’t organize your own online giving day for your supporters!

Just so we’re clear, an online giving day is a 24-hour period where a nonprofit tries to raise as much money as possible from its supporters.

An online giving day has to have a lot of digital promotion and advertising to make it effective. Reach out to your supporters:

  • With emails.
  • Over social media.
  • Via text message.
  • On your website.
  • With videos.

These digital outreach methods should contain information about your giving day such as the time, ways to donate, what the funds will go toward, and how supporters can get more involved.

Here’s an example of an animal nonprofit that promotes #GivingTuesday on Twitter:

Of course, Twitter has character limitations, so this tweet had to be short and sweet. Your other digital promotions for your giving day can go a bit more in-depth and include more specific information about your online fundraiser.

Whatever route you take, make sure that you explain what the funds are going toward and provide supporters with a link to your online donation page.

Main Takeaway: An online giving day can be an energetic and fast-paced way to raise money for your cause. Electrify your donor base with lots of digital promotions and encourage them to give as much as they can in just 24 hours!

Bonus: Take a look at these #GivingTuesday promotional resources.

Holding a text-to-give campaign is an excellent online fundraising idea.

7. Text-to-Give Campaign

Text-to-give came on the scene as a digital fundraising method in 2010 when millions of dollars were donated to the American Red Cross to support victims of the Haiti earthquake.

Since then, text-to-give (or text-to-tithe for churches) has become a mainstream way to raise money for any organization or cause!

Today, text-to-give tends to work like this:

  1. A donor will text a keyword to a specific number that has been assigned to a nonprofit.
  2. The donor will receive a link as a text message.
  3. The link takes the donors to a mobile-responsive donation page where they can make a contribution.

It’s that easy!

When choosing a text-to-give tool, look for a provider that is PCI-compliant, which means the company follows strict rules to ensure a high level of security.

Ease of use and integration are also vital characteristics to look for in a text-to-give tool. You want the giving process to be quick and simple for donors as well as have a way to export data to your CRM.

Many nonprofits, schools, and churches use text-to-give technology as an online fundraising avenue throughout the year, but it’s also a popular donation method during fundraising events. One of your speakers can make a live appeal and ask people to give with their cellphones (all of your attendees will likely have their phones in their pockets or purses!).

Main Takeaway: Text-to-give is quickly becoming one of the most popular online fundraising ideas. Don’t get left behind with this fundraising trend!

Bonus: Check out the ultimate guide to text-to-give.

Viral fundraising campaigns are a savvy online fundraising idea.

8. Viral Fundraising Campaign

You’ve likely heard of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, but you may not know just how successful that particular viral fundraising campaign was.

In just a month and a half, the ALS Association was able to raise $115 million (and tons of awareness!) for ALS research by asking people to pour cold water on their heads.

Another example of a viral fundraising campaign is “Movember.” For this viral campaign, men grow out their facial hair during the month of November and make donations in support of men’s health.

These are just two of the many viral fundraising campaigns that nonprofits have started. Why not start your own?

Keep these tips in mind before trying to launch a viral fundraising campaign. And remember, it might take a few months or even more than a year for your campaign to go truly viral.

  1. Don’t ask for too much. You aren’t going to receive a ton of donations if you ask for $500 every time. Instead, ask people for small contributions like $5, $10, or $20. Once a campaign goes viral, all of those little donations will add up!
  2. Create a memorable hashtag. Hashtags help group your social media posts and make your nonprofit’s message easier to find on platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Create a memorable and punchy hashtag. Use it in all of your social media posts and encourage your supporters to use it, as well!
  3. Get to the point. A viral campaign has to be focused and targeted. It’s not the time to explain every single detail of your nonprofit’s mission. Instead, boil down your vision to a few key points and use them interchangeably throughout the duration of your campaign.
  4. Make use of all of your digital channels. Post on Facebook. Tweet out a promotional message. Snap a picture and post it to Instagram. Start a Pinterest board. Send out emails. Use every digital communications channel at your disposal!

Main Takeaway: It might take time to get a viral fundraising campaign off the ground, but if you can do it, your nonprofit’s mission and vision will be made known to supporters across the country and even around the world!

Another online fundraising idea nonprofits can turn to is using online cashback websites.

9. Online Cashback Websites

Online cashback sites can be used by nonprofits as well as individuals who are looking to raise a little extra money while doing something that nearly everyone loves: shopping online!

Let’s break down how most online cashback websites work:

  1. Someone in your nonprofit needs to buy office supplies or something else online.
  2. The staff member begins their search for office supplies at an online cashback site.
  3. Once the items have been purchased, a percentage of the total amount is deposited into a cashback account.
  4. Your nonprofit can withdraw the cashback amount at regular intervals (typically monthly or quarterly).

Common cashback sites include:

In addition to these sites, Amazon, the largest online shopping marketplace, has created an affiliate program that enables nonprofits to receive a certain percentage of sales that originate on the nonprofit’s website.

With Amazon’s affiliate program, your nonprofit can place banners, images, and links on your website that will direct users to a page on Amazon’s site. If the user makes a purchase, your nonprofit gets a cut of the purchase from Amazon.

While cashback sites aren’t going to help your nonprofit break any fundraising records, they are an easy way to raise more money from online shopping. Signing up for most of these cashback sites is easy, and everyone in your nonprofit can participate!

Main Takeaway: Online cashback sites can supplement your existing fundraising efforts. If your staff does a lot of online shopping, sites like Ebates and Amazon can be an easy way to raise extra funds!

Online auctions are another smart online fundraising idea.

10. Online Auctions

Online auctions are essentially digital silent auctions that are more cost-effective and are open to all your supporters, increasing fundraising potential even more.

For your digital venue, you can opt to use auction software or an online marketplace like eBay to host your online auction. 

Just like with any charity auction, you’ll need to procure items and experiences that excite your guests and encourage them to place bids.

Look for unique items that your guests won’t be able to find anywhere else. Look at the following suggestions to help you get started:

  • Sports memorabilia.
  • Backstage passes to a concert.
  • Tickets to an exclusive museum exhibit.
  • And so much more!

Generate excitement before your event by creating an auction catalog with images and a description of each item (or experience) and teach registered guests how to place bids to prepare them for the big day.

Main Takeaway: Online auctions make it possible for supporters from all over the world to participate and are cost-effective so that you can raise the most money from your event.

One online fundraising idea is holding a donation for a vote fundraiser.

11. Donation for a Vote

The donation for a vote online fundraising idea gets your supporters engaged in a silly challenge in return for their contributions.

Here’s how this fundraiser works:

  1. Create a list of silly challenges that your staff or volunteers are willing to complete.
  2. Create a poll, asking your supporters to vote (with a donation) for the challenge they’d like to see your team complete.
  3. At the end of the poll, record your team completing whatever challenge received the most votes and post it on social media.

The challenges you pick should be interesting and if possible, related to your cause in some way.

In the video, thank your supporters for their contributions, and mention how the funds will be used to further your cause.

Supporters will get a kick out of seeing you do a silly task, and you’ll raise more money for your cause!

Not only will donors like seeing a hilarious video, but they’ll also appreciate that you want their opinion and input. Plus, supporters will encourage their peers to vote so they can see their favorite challenge win. 

Main Takeaway: Donation for a vote is a fun (and potentially viral) way to raise money for your cause. Makes sure to choose your challenges and continue to encourage your supporters to vote.


Once you start bringing in that fresh funding, you’ll want to be sure you’re being fiscally responsible and financially accountable.

It’s easy to get lost in the exciting rush of new funds, but you need to be smart about how you handle it. These 7 financial strategies can help you do just that:

  1. Be prepared with better financial reports.
  2. Forget about spreadsheets.
  3. Get everyone involved.
  4. Stay focused with performance analytics.
  5. Strategize about growth.
  6. Use forecasting and budgets to set goals.
  7. Stay on top of report changes.

You can read more about those seven practices here. And as long as you follow them, you’ll be able to reap the rewards of following through on the 10 online fundraising ideas detailed above.

We hope that these 11 online fundraising ideas have inspired you to go out and try some different fundraising techniques.

For more ideas and tips, check out these helpful resources:

  • Beginner’s Guide to Online Fundraising. Need to get back to the basics when it comes to online fundraising? Visit MobileCause for an in-depth beginner’s guide to better understand this important subject.
  • 80+ Fundraising IdeasCouldn’t find what you were looking for with our online fundraising ideas? Check out our full list of ideas. You’re sure to find the perfect fundraiser for your cause!
  • Church Fundraising IdeasIf you’re looking for ways to raise money for churches and other faith-based organizations, we’ve got a list of ideas that will help you reach your goals.
  • School Fundraising IdeasSchools need to find family-friendly ways to raise money and engage their students. Check out this list of top ideas from Fundly to get started!
  • Top Online Donation Tools. If you want to start fundraising online, you’ll need software to accept donations. Use this list of top tools to find online donation software for your organization!
  • Crowdfunding Websites for Individuals. An essential part of crowdfunding is picking a platform, and with over 190 crowdfunding websites in the United States alone, there’s a lot of options to choose from. Luckily, we’ve narrowed down the list to our favorite 9 websites!

6 types of fundraising letters for nonprofits

6 Types of Fundraising Letters: Write Amazing Appeals!

Sending out fundraising letters might seem like an old-fashioned way to ask for donations, but they can be extremely effective when written correctly!

If you’ve been looking for fundraising letters, look no further! We’ve got six of the most common fundraising letters that nonprofits should be sending out to their donors.

Here’s what we’ll be going over:

  1. Donation Request Letters
  2. Church Fundraising Letters
  3. Individual Fundraising Letters
  4. Matching Gift Fundraising Letters
  5. Sponsorship Letters
  6. Donor Thank-You Letters

Let’s jump right in!

1. Donation Request Letters

Fundraising Letters - donation request letters

What are donation request letters?

Donation request letters are nonprofit fundraising letters that charitable organizations send out to individual donors and/or prospects.

They can be sent on their own or included in a welcome packet that contains pamphlets, booklets, and additional information.

When should you use them?

Your nonprofit can use donation request letters at any time of the year! However, they are particularly effective toward the end of the calendar year when donors are determining their pre-tax season finances. People also tend to be more charitable in November and December, which means that your donation request letter has a better chance of encouraging a donation.

You can send out donation request letters to any of your donors, but these types of communications are better received by older generations. While millennials respond to digital donation appeals, the baby boomer generation overwhelmingly prefers direct mail.

Example letter


Date

Your Name
Your Organization’s Name
Street
City, State ZIP

Dear [Donor’s Name],

[Begin with an emotional appeal. A success story or a narrative that tugs on your donors’ heartstrings hooks your readers. Keep it short, though!]

Our community/nation/world is facing [problem(s) your organization is trying to fix]. While we are actively [insert current solutions your organization is attempting], we need your help to make our efforts go even further!

You can help us [solve the problem you’re trying to fix]. Your support is crucial to our efforts to [solve the problem].
If you’re able, we’d love it if you could make a donation of [amount] to help us achieve our mission and [solve problem].

Thank you in advance for your contribution. Your donation will go toward [insert effort, accomplishment, or project].

Here are the ways you can make a donation:

— Make a donation online at [URL to donation page or crowdfunding campaign page]
— Call us at [phone number]
— Send a check in the pre-stamped envelope we’ve included (no cash, please!)
— Text [keyword] to [text-to-give phone number]

Thank you again!
Sincerely,

[Signature of an organizational leader]
[Typed name of organizational leader]

P.S. [End with an update about an upcoming event, volunteer opportunity, or other information]

 



2. Church Fundraising Letters

Fundraising Letters - church fundraising letters

What are church fundraising letters?

Church fundraising letters can take many forms. They can be used to ask for general church-related contributions, but they can also be used for specific fundraising efforts such as:

  • Charity auction item requests.
  • Fundraising event donations.
  • Sponsorship requests.
  • Mission trip funding.
  • Church building funds.
  • Missionary support.

It’s common for churches to send out fundraising letters to notify congregants when church events or other fundraising initiatives are occurring. These types of fundraising letters can be used to share the details—date, time, location, etc.—of the event as well as encourage those who can’t attend to give in advance.

For our purposes, we’ll be talking about a generic church fundraising letter that you can use to ask for general contributions.

You can send church fundraising letters to members of your congregation or to community members, depending on your fundraising need.

When should you use them?

You can send out church letters whenever you have a fundraising need! Churches rely on the generosity of their congregants to keep the doors open and the lights on.

Of course, you shouldn’t send out too many church fundraising letters. Limit your letters to a few per year and rely on in-person appeals during a church service for the majority of your fundraising efforts.

Sample letter


Date

Your Name
Your Church’s Name
Street
City, State ZIP

Dear [Church Member’s Preferred Name],

Greetings! We hope this letter finds you well and that you’ve had a relaxing, blessed holiday season. Because you’re an important part of our church family, we thought you’d want to know about our big plans for this new year.

As you may know, our congregation is growing. Just like any family, the more members you have, the more room you need. We’re pleased to invite you to be an important part of this exciting process!

This Sunday afternoon, [your church’s name] is hosting a special event to raise money for the brand new sanctuary and bell tower. How blessed are we to have so many members like yourself that we need to build an entirely new structure?

It’s our greatest hope that you’ll be able to join us at [date and time] for a family fun carnival! Snacks and drinks will be provided for a small price. The only thing you need to bring is your sense of fun and adventure!

Admission is free, but of course, willing contributions of any size are always accepted.

If you have any questions about the event or the new sanctuary or bell tower, please feel free to reach out to our special projects coordinator, [name] at [phone number] or email her at [email address].

As always, have a blessed day. We hope to see you Sunday!

His Clay,

[Pastor’s Signature]

[Pastor’s Name]



3. Individual Fundraising Letters

Fundraising Letters - individual fundraising letters

What are individual fundraising letters?

Nonprofits aren’t the only ones who have fundraising needs! Sometimes individuals need to raise money for a cause, project, or life event.

If that’s the case, you can use individual fundraising letters to send out donation requests to members of your community and local businesses.

Whatever you’re raising money for, an individual fundraising letter can help you generate funds for your cause, project, or event!

When should you use them?

You can use an individual fundraising letter whenever you need to raise money for a cause or project that means a lot to you. Of course, you shouldn’t just rely on fundraising letters to raise money.

You can set up a crowdfunding campaign to supplement your fundraising efforts. You can also use your fundraising letter to direct people to your crowdfunding page to give them an easy way to make a donation.

Letter template


Date

Your Name
Street
City, State ZIP

Dear [Donor’s Name],

My name is [your name] and I am [describe your position/situation/background]. I am looking to raise [amount of money] to help me pay for [project/expense/cause/etc.].

[Include information about why the cause or project is important to you and how it could potentially impact the reader or those you serve].

I’m writing to ask you to support me and my [cause/project/etc.]. Just a small donation of [amount] can help me [accomplish task/reach a goal/etc.]

Your donation will go toward [describe exactly what the contribution will be used for].

[When possible, add a personal connection to tie the donor to the cause. For example, if you’re raising money to help build a school in a developing country and you’re writing to a teacher, emphasize the fact that everyone deserves a quality education].

Thank you in advance for your contribution. You have no idea how much it means to me to have your support.

Here are the ways you can make a donation:

— Make a donation online at [URL of your crowdfunding campaign]
— Send a check in the pre-stamped envelope I’ve included (no cash, please!)
— Come to my fundraising event on [date] at [location] [when applicable]

Thank you again!
Sincerely,

[Your signature]
[Your typed name]



4. Matching Gift Fundraising Emails or Letters

Fundraising Letters - matching gift fundraising letters

What are matching gift fundraising letters?

Matching gift fundraising letters are tangible letters (or emails) that nonprofits send out to donors to remind them to submit matching gift requests.

For those who don’t know, matching gifts are a type of corporate giving program. After an employee has made a charitable donation to an eligible nonprofit, they can submit paperwork to their company’s HR department. If the donation and the nonprofit meet the company’s requirements, the business will make a contribution to the nonprofit for the same amount.

However, many donors simply don’t know that their employer offers a matching gift program.

That’s where a matching gift fundraising letter comes in!

Your nonprofit should send out communications to remind donors that their contributions might be eligible to be doubled (and sometimes, even tripled!).

When should you use them?

The best time to promote matching gifts (besides during the donation process itself) is directly after a donation has been made.

Your nonprofit is still fresh in donors’ minds, and they’ll be more likely to submit a matching gift request.

As soon as a donor has made a contribution (regardless of how the donation was made), your nonprofit should send out an automatic email that:

  1. Thanks them for their donation, and
  2. Encourages them to submit a matching gift request.

You can also follow up a few days later with a matching gift fundraising letter if the donor hasn’t already submitted a matching gift request.

Example letter


Here is an example of a matching gift fundraising email:

Matching gift fundraising letters

This is an excellent example of a direct mail letter/postcard that promotes matching gifts:

Matching gift fundraising letters

Use these letters and emails in conjunction with one another to maximize your nonprofit’s matching gift potential!



5. Sponsorship Letters

Fundraising Letters - sponsorship letters

What are sponsorship letters?

Sponsorship letters are used by nonprofits that are looking to receive corporate sponsorship donations for a specific project or event.

Sponsorship letter packages include:

  • A sponsorship proposal cover letter.
  • A sponsorship levels document.
  • A sponsorship acknowledgement letter.

The proposal letter is the formal request for a sponsorship donation. It explains the nonprofit’s fundraising need and details how the funds will be used.

The sponsorship levels document is how companies decide how much they would like to give. This document lists out a few different sponsorship levels and the perks that come with each level. The higher the donation, the more perks the company receives.

The sponsorship acknowledgement letter is a thank-you to the company after they have made a donation. Your nonprofit can send out an acknowledgement immediately after a donation has been made and after the event has ended.

When should you use them?

Sponsorship letters should be sent out well in advance of your event or project. You want to give the company enough time to consider and respond to your donation request.

Sample letter


Date

Your Name
Your Organization’s Name
Street
City, State ZIP

Dear [CEO/CSR Manager/Business Owner/etc.],

[Open with a description of your organization. Give some brief background including your mission, vision, and how you serve your community.]

We are hosting our [event name] on [date] at [location]. Last year’s event was such a huge success that we decided to host the event again!

In the past, this event has raised [amount] and has [list out specific accomplishments using statistics and figures].

This year we’re hoping to raise even more! Our goal is [amount], and we were hoping that you could help us reach that goal.

By becoming one of our corporate sponsors, you’ll be able to [list out projects that corporate donations could help accomplish].
We’ve also listed out some of the incentives and perks that your company can enjoy should you decide to become one of our corporate sponsors (see attached Sponsorship Levels Document). Regardless of the amount you choose to give, your company name will be included in our event program and you’ll be included in the press release that we’ll publish on our website.

We’re accepting cash donations as well as in-kind donations of goods or services. Feel free to make a contribution that you’re comfortable with.

See the attached Sponsorship Levels Document to find the giving level that’s right for your company. If you’re ready to make a donation, please tear off the perforated section of the following document and send it back to us in the self-addressed envelope we’ve enclosed.

I’d like to thank you in advance for your generosity. Please don’t hesitate to contact me directly at [phone number] or [email] if you have any questions.

Sincerely/All the best/etc.,

[Your printed name]
[Your title]

[Your signature]



6. Donor Thank-You Letters

Fundraising Letters - donor thank you letters

What are donor thank-you letters?

Donor thank-you letter are pretty self-explanatory.

These letters (or emails!) are meant to be used after a donor has made a contribution of any kind, including:

  • Monetary contributions.
  • In-kind donations.
  • Volunteer time.
  • A matching gift from an employer.
  • And more!

When should you use them?

Your donor thank-you letters should be sent out as soon as you receive a contribution. Donors should receive an acknowledgement within two days of making a donation.

Feel free to send out an acknowledgement email as well as a direct mail letter. You can never be too appreciative of your donors!

Letter template


Date

Your Name
Your Organization’s Name
Street
City, State ZIP

Dear [Donor’s Preferred Name],

I can’t tell you how much all of us at [nonprofit name] appreciate your contribution to our cause. Thanks to your donation of [amount], we’ll be able to [list out specific goals, objectives, etc.].

I also wanted to let you know that we’ll be [hosting volunteer event, opening up our nonprofit’s doors for tours, holding a fundraising event, etc.]. We’d love to extend an invitation to you to participate in this opportunity! Our current donors have all enjoyed developing a stronger partnership with our organization, and I’m hoping you’ll do the same.

Thank you again!

[Your printed name]
[Your title]

[Your signature]


We hope that these six fundraising letter templates have given you some insight into how to write an amazing fundraising appeal. Which ones have you used in the past? Which letters have you had the most success with?

If you want to learn more valuable fundraising tips, check out these additional resources:

  1. Must-Know Nonprofit Software: Every nonprofit needs fundraising software if they want to raise money online. Learn about the top vendors providing nonprofits with top-notch tools to help you raise more donations.
  2. Online Fundraising Guide: Looking for more ways you can raise money online. You’re in luck! This extensive guide will lead you through everything you need to know about raising money online.
  3. 113+ Fundraising Ideas: Put your new fundraising letters to use by hosting a fundraiser. With our list of over one hundred ways to raise money, you’re bound to find an idea that will work perfectly for your nonprofit.


Fundraising Strategies and Nonprofit Technology Blog Carnival

Annual Fund Development: 21+ Expert Fundraising Strategies

As we were putting together our very own guide to annual giving, we realized something — annual fund development would be the perfect topic for the launch of the Fundraising Strategies and Nonprofit Tech Carnival.

Why? Annual giving is something every nonprofit has to tackle, and true annual giving success only occurs when a nonprofit can master a huge variety of fundraising skills and tactics.

And now, with all the technology that’s available, there’s more to gain but also more to master.

With that in mind, we decided to reach out to all of you, our readers and friends within the nonprofit community, to see what helpful tips and advice you have.

We received all sorts of great advice and have divided it into the following categories:

You can click on any of the categories above to be directed right to that section or keep scrolling to read about all the various resources we were sent!

General Annual Giving Best Practices and Improvement Tactics

Ronald Pruitt’s “Growing Your Annual Fund: 7 Top Strategies”

What better place to start a carnival all about annual fund development than with a blog post about just that? In this article on 4aGoodCause’s blog, Pruitt details 7 actionable strategies that nonprofits can implement to optimize their annual giving campaign.

For instance, he offers this online donation form advice for recurring giving:

The key to turning one time donors into recurring givers is to make recurring giving as clear and convenient as possible.

Click here for more of Ronald’s advice.

NeonCRM’s “Annual Giving: The Definitive Guide”

If you want a comprehensive look at annual giving, this is a great resource.

One section that’s particularly helpful for this carnival comes toward the end of the guide, when the resource covers how fundraising software can help.

As the resource details:

Your annual campaign is all about stewarding donors and getting to know them! Donor databases make forming deeper relationships with your donors so much easier.

Click here to learn much more from NeonCRM’s guide.

Tina Jepson’s “How Crowdfunding Can Help You Raise More Money for your Annual Fund”

This post on CauseVox’s blog is all about how you can use crowdfunding to help raise money for your annual giving campaigns.

In the article, Tina shares examples of how crowdfunding can help you engage your supporters in a new way, expand your campaign’s reach, and raise more money.

The article is designed to help your nonprofit decide if crowdfunding is right for your next annual giving campaign.

Click here to read the full article on CauseVox’s blog.

DonorSearch’s “Annual Fund Strategies: A Nonprofit’s Guide”

In this detailed listing of annual fund strategies, DonorSearch separates the advice into four sections:

  1. Campaign planning
  2. Outreach and Stewardship
  3. Direct Asks
  4. Events

For instance, within the section on campaign planning, they suggest that nonprofits should conduct prospect research.

The guide explains:

Major gifts will make up a large portion of the funds you’ll raise during your annual campaign. Prospect research will help your organization focus in on those who have the financial resources and philanthropic drive to be major gift donors.

Click here to read all of DonorSearch’s Annual Fund Strategies.

David Blyer’s “Monthly: The New Preferred Giving Cycle”

In his article on monthly giving’s impact on yearly fundraising, David Blyer of DonorCommunity places an emphasis on the fundraising potential awaiting nonprofits who push for monthly giving, specifically through online channels.

He explains that, “The opportunity for incremental, steady income from a monthly giving program is a fantastic way to grow your annual funds.”

Click here for more of the monthly giving versus annual campaign discussion.

Salsa’s “Amazing Guide to Advocacy”

After thorough research on annual giving, it’s likely that you’ve encountered plenty of advice about offering other engagement opportunities to your supporters.

This diversity of engagement experiences gives donors the chance to see more sides of your organization and build a deeper connection to the cause and the work you do.

As far as diversifying engagement goes, advocacy activities should be at the top of the list.

Click here to view the guide and learn more about advocacy.

Qgiv’s “How to Retain More Donors During Your Annual Campaign”

What better way to end the best practices section than with a resource that talks all about annual campaign donor retention?

The resource gets to the core of how crucial retention is and how powerful a force the annual campaign can be in that effort, explaining:

Since an annual fund is all about raising money and developing relationships with donors, there are ample opportunities for your nonprofit to engage with supporters in a more personal way.

Click here to learn more about retention and annual campaigns.

Tips for Better Annual Gift Solicitation

Claire Axelrad’s “3-Word Formula Guaranteed to Raise More Money”

This article comes to us from Claire Axelrad, the fundraising expert behind Clairification. In the article, she covers three words that can make all the difference in the world during your next annual giving campaign.

What are those three words? You. Because. Thanks.

Sounds simple, but the beauty is in the simplicity. Head over to the original article to learn how Claire turns those three words into fundraising magic.

Click here to get the full rundown from Claire herself.

Little Green Light’s “6 Steps to a Successful Fundraising Appeal”

You can’t develop your annual fund without a proper appeal strategy in place. Little Green Light has put together an eBook all about that appeal process.

The free resource leads readers through the six steps of the appeal process, from identification to post-appeal analysis.

Click here to visit the download page for the free eBook.

Stefanie Pous’ “Throughout the Generations: Trends in Annual Giving”

For this very carnival, Stefanie Pous of Elevation Web put together an analysis of annual giving trends based on donor age group.

In the analysis, she builds her advice based on the evidence at hand. For instance, she found that Baby Boomers, “are the most generous of all generations — donating $47 billion annually between check writing and online giving.”

Taking that check writing and online giving into account, Pous explains that you should focus your solicitation efforts on voice calls and email but not count out text messaging and social media.

Click here to get her statistic-backed advice for all donor generations.

Greta Daniels’ “Segment and Test: A Scientific Method for Annual Giving Donor Analysis”

In her article on EverTrue’s blog, Greta Daniels addresses a critical element of effective fundraising appeals: personalization.

The post discusses the importance of donor personalization when soliciting support for the annual fund, and offers advice on how to create personalized donor segments and test them using a scientific approach.

Click here for the full set of instructions for the annual giving scientific method.

Annual Fund Communications

@Pay’s “Nonprofit Email Newsletters: 28+ Actionable Tips”

Email newsletters have steadily risen in popularity, and they’re here to stay. Whether you’re looking to share details about your annual giving campaign or call attention to some of your most generous annual fund donors, an email newsletter is likely going to be part of the picture.

Luckily, @Pay has compiled more than 28 tips for perfecting your email newsletters. Find the advice you need to take your annual fund email newsletters to the next level.

Click here for the complete list.

Julia Campbell’s “5 Ways to Tackle Your Nonprofit’s Fear of Social Media”

On her #501Social blog, Campbell opens her article by saying the following, “Starting on social media can be a scary proposition for many nonprofits.”

But then she goes on to explain, “While this fear is understandable, unfortunately it is also counterproductive. The benefits of using social media to interact with donors and to tell stories vastly outweigh the potential negatives.”

And she’s right. Bottom line: in our current culture, leaving social media out of your annual fund strategy is unacceptable.

If you’re struggling to get organization-wide support of social media activities, use the advice from Julia’s article.

Click to learn Julia’s 5 strategies.

iATS Payments’ “How Nonprofits Can Benefit from New Facebook Fundraising Feature”

If you really want to take your annual fund growth to the next level, it’s important to stay on the cutting edge of fundraising technology developments.

And recently, Facebook added a feature that lets users create fundraising pages for the nonprofits of their choosing. Handled correctly, this is an excellent avenue for supporters to help your organization grow its communications network.

Click here to get advice right from the source.

Ideas to Grow the Annual Fund Through Fundraising Events

 

Wild Apricot’s “How to Take Charge of Your Fundraising Event”

Have you ever calculated the return on your investment for your fundraisers? If you factor in all the costs, you might discover what many nonprofits discover — your events lose money. But does that mean you should stop running them? Not so fast.

You just have to apply the right strategy and follow a few best practices, which is what you’ll learn in the guest post by Claire Axelrad on Wild Apricot’s blog.

Click here to read more about taking charge.

Susan Diener’s “How Nonprofits Can Use Fundraisers to Build an Annual Fund”

In her post, Fundraiser Insight’s Susan Diener addresses fundraising events and annual funds head on.

She explains:

One surefire way to see new donations come in, while giving you plenty of time with current or potential donors, is through fundraising events. Events are an excellent way to gather people who are passionate about your cause and create some momentum for your annual fund.”

Click here for all 6 tips.

BidPal’s “How to Run a Charity Auction”

These days, many fundraising events feature auctions. They are the perfect opportunity to bring new supporters into the giving fold, so it’s crucial that you host the best charity auction possible.

BidPal offers an entire resource dedicated to just that.

Click here for BidPal’s how-to guide.

Learn more about charity auction fundraising tools.

Strategies to Build Donor Trust

WholeWhale’s “Ultimate Guide for the Nonprofit RFP Process, with Examples & Templates”

As more and more annual fundraising moves online, it has become much more of a priority for nonprofit websites to be the best of the best.

Simply put, people are less likely to give if they feel they can’t trust the website they’re on. An underperforming website is going to have a huge impact on the success of your annual fund.

So if you’re in the position where you need a new website, look no further than this resource from WholeWhale to make a nonprofit RFP (Request for Proposal).

Click here for a walk through of the entire Nonprofit RFP process.

Aespire’s “Safe and Secure: Creating a Trusted Web Experience”

This post is all about designing a website that fosters trust with your donors. That way, your annual fund donors can feel safe and secure throughout the online giving process.

As the article explains:

While it may sound complicated and/or scary, website security is relatively simple to implement and has the benefit of reassuring your donors that their trust in your organization is well placed.

From there, the article delves into just how to create a trusted web experience.

Click here for Aespire’s advice.

James Gilmer’s “Top 20 Reasons Nonprofits Register for Charitable Solicitation”

Charitable solicitation requirements apply when you are asking for donations to grow your annual giving base and when donors make substantial or repeated donations.

While the IRS and registering for charitable solicitation is a complex and intimidating topic to tackle, it is paramount to any nonprofit’s success in all areas of fundraising, especially long-term fundraising for recurring donations to the annual fund.

That’s where James Gilmer’s post on the Harbor Compliance blog comes in.

Click here to read James’ list.


That’s it for this month’s installment of the carnival!

Don’t forget to subscribe to the newsletter for updates! And be sure to email any questions or ideas to Taylor Gibbs.

Donation form optimization hacks

10 Donation Form Optimization Hacks to Raise More Funds!

If your nonprofit has started asking for donations online or via mobile devices, then congratulations! Your organization is part of a growing movement to shift fundraising to more efficient and accessible methods.

With all of the new technology that seems to be changing every minute, it can be difficult to pinpoint what makes an online donation form so amazing.

Is it the image at the top of the form?

Is it the ease of giving?

Perhaps it’s the consistent branding?

Hint: It’s all of these (plus a few extra!).

This article will serve as your one-stop shop for donation form optimizations. Whether you’re building one from the ground up or you’re looking to enhance the donation form you already have, these tricks and tips can help guide you toward an amazing donation form that will encourage donors to keep giving.

  1. Get the Word Out
  2. Simplify Your Donation Form
  3. Offer Different Giving Levels
  4. Encourage Donors to Look Into Other Giving Opportunities
  5. Remind Donors of Why They’re Giving
  6. Keep Your Branding Consistent
  7. Give Donors the Opportunity to Share their Donation on Social Media
  8. Create a Seamless Giving Experience Across all Giving Channels
  9. Go Mobile
  10. Plan for What Happens Afterwards

Let’s dive right into these 10 donation form optimization hacks your organization should implement.

And for ten more tips, check out Qgiv’s list of 20 donation form best practices.

get the word out

1. Get The Word Out

No one will know about your donation form if you don’t tell them about it.

You’re likely already asking your supporters for their donations of time and money. Use those donation appeals to drive traffic to your online donation page.

Include info about your donation form:

Whenever  you’re communicating with donors, you should be spreading the word about your online donation page.

Takeaway: Getting the word out about your donation form is crucial for seeing those spikes in traffic and, eventually, that boost in your donor conversion rate.

simplify your donation form

2. Simplify Your Donation Form

Does your donation page have five images, three blocks of text, and links to other pages on your site?

If yes, it might be time to rethink the formatting of your donation form.

The fewer distractions donors have once they land on your donation page, the better. You want to keep them focused on the task at hand: donating.

Take this nonprofit’s donation form, for example:

Her Song Donation FormNotice how clean and streamlined this donation form looks. The nonprofit’s logo is featured at the top, and the only other text on the form is for the “Freedom Campaign.”

Incorporating cluttering links and extraneous navigation only distracts donors from the giving process.

Takeaway: Maximize your donor conversion rate by keeping supporters focused on donating.

offer different giving levels

3. Offer Different Giving Levels

Sometimes, donors need a little nudge in the right direction.

Your donation form can give them a that nudge with the end result being larger donations!

How?

Let me explain:

If a donor arrives on your donation page with the intention of giving $45, sees an empty field labeled, “Donation Amount,” she’s likely to type in “45” and complete the donation.

But, if that same donor sees options for $10, $25, $30, $50, and so on, she’s far more likely to choose the $50 option.

Why?

It’s simple psychology, really. Donors want to appear more generous. The extra five dollars doesn’t seem like an extra expense, and it’s easier for them to simply select an option than plug in their own donation amount.

Check out this example donation form:

styles 4 girlz donation form

You should, of course, still offer a blank field for donors who want to choose their own amount. Donors are the ones in control of their finances, and they know what’s best for their wallets.

Note how this example also describes what each donation level provides for, in this case, girls in need. This way, donors know the impact of their donation.

Takeaway: Offer donors different giving levels to increase donation amounts and keep donors informed of what their donations go toward.

encourage donors to look into other giving opportunities

4. Encourage Donors to Look Into Other Giving Opportunities

In addition to the aforementioned tips and tricks, you should also dedicate a section of your donation form to matching gifts, volunteering opportunities, and other giving avenues.

Donors who find themselves on your donation form might be first time supporters or lifetime donors.

Give both demographics a chance to continue giving to your organization by offering other giving options on your donation page.

Check out this example nonprofit:

Boys and Girls Club Donation Form

This donation form only touches on planned giving and matching gifts, but you can include information about:

Just remember that the more options you offer on your donation page, the lower your donor conversion rate will be. If you want to find out about what other types of giving opportunities your donors might be interested in, you can also ask them directly or send out a survey via email.

Takeaway: Use your donation form to capture interest in other giving avenues, but be careful about including too many options.

remind donors of why they're giving

5. Remind Donors of Why They’re Giving

Donors give to your organization because they feel deeply connected to your cause. They want to help you accomplish your mission and demonstrate their support with donations.

Your donation form should help remind donors of why they’re contributing to your organization in the first place. 

Let me explain with an example:

bbbs northern nj donation form

This donation form accomplishes a few things at once:

  1. It provides context for what donations will go toward.
  2. It shows, with a single image, the people who will benefit from donations.
  3. It gives an email address and a phone number for more information or questions.

Notice that the top of this donation form is still simple and doesn’t overwhelm the user. It does, however, provide an emotional appeal for donors who arrive on the page. The image is heart-warming, and the text gives donors the context they may need to finish the donation process.

Takeaway: Remind donors of why they’re giving by including images and brief text to help put their donation in context.

keep your branding consistent

6. Keep your Branding Consistent

Imagine this: one of your newest supporters finds himself on your website, looking at your Ways to Give page.

Your entire website is consistent: you use the same colors, logos, and fonts on all of your pages and blog posts.

But when he clicks on your “Donate Now” button, he is taken to a donation form that is devoid of those same colors, logos, and fonts.

In fact, the donation form could be for anything, and it certainly doesn’t feel like it belongs on your nonprofit’s website.

You can remedy this issue by keeping your brand consistent throughout your website and your donation form.

Let’s look at a quick example:

Her Song Donation Form

Notice how the logo is still present at the top while “Home” is highlighted in red. The fonts are all consistent, creating a seamless giving experience for donors.

Takeaway: Maintain uniform branding across your website and your donation form to give supporters a great donating experience.

Bonus: Looking for a website design firm to help you maintain a cohesive brand on your nonprofit’s website and donation forms? Check out this helpful list of website builders.

give donors the opportunity to share their donation on social media

7. Give Donors the Opportunity to Share their Donation on Social Media

If you want to expand your donor base and give your existing supporters the chance to brag about themselves a little bit, include social media sharing buttons somewhere on your donation form.

Of course, the post that gets shared shouldn’t include any of their personal or financial information. It can be something as simple as a link to your donation form!

Take a look at this example:

Arizona Literacy and Learning Center Donation Form

Note how this particular donation form includes social sharing information at the top of the form. Donors can recommend or share on Facebook or tweet a link to the donation form via Twitter.

Takeaway: Your donation form should be just as shareable as the rest of the content on your website. Include social sharing buttons to encourage donors to brag about themselves to their social networks.

create a seamless giving experience across all giving channels

8. Create a Seamless Giving Experience Across all Giving Channels

Some of your donors aren’t going to want to give online. They might prefer giving over the phone, by mail, or via other traditional donating methods.

How do these donors fit into your online fundraising strategy, though?

The key is to make sure that all donors have a great giving experience, regardless of their method of donating.

This means that you should:

  • Maintain consistent branding in all communications.
  • Segment your appeals.
  • Be genuine during all of your asks.
  • Acknowledge consistently.

Creating a seamless giving experience across all of your giving channels will help donors who move from giving via check to giving online feel more confident in their switch.

Takeaway: Make sure that your organization is consistent when making donation appeals with several different methods and strategies.

go mobile

9. Go Mobile

Did you know that 91% of American adults own a smartphone?

It’s extremely likely that many of those smartphone users are learning about your nonprofit on their mobile devices.

Is your donation form optimized for their mobile giving experience? 

If not, you might be missing out on a serious chunk of your online donations.

Let’s take a look at what a mobile donation form should look like:

her song mobile donation form

See how this donation form sticks to the first 8 tips we’ve covered? The branding is consistent, it’s simple, and there are social sharing buttons at the top of the page.

Takeaway: Make your donation page mobile to raise money from donors who like to give on the go!

plan for what happens afterwards

10. Plan for What Happens Afterwards

Just because a donor isn’t giving in person or over the phone doesn’t mean that the donation process should be impersonal or distant.

On the contrary, since online giving leans toward a more anonymous experience, your donor acknowledgements should be more tailored to donors.

This means that you can’t just have an acknowledgement screen after the donation has gone through that says, “Thanks!” and hope that that covers it.

You’ll also need to send a follow up email or letter that contains a donation receipt and a genuine acknowledgement of the contribution.

Furthermore, you should reference past donations in future appeals. Donors will be grateful for your appreciation of their previous gifts. It might even encourage them to give more in the future!

Takeaway: Make sure that you have a solid acknowledgement plan in place for your online supporters.

 

If you follow these ten tips, you should be on your way to donation form success. Don’t miss out on substantial donations by having a lackluster donation form.


Abby Jarvis QgivAbby Jarvis is a blogger, marketer, and communications coordinator for Qgiv, an online fundraising service provider.

Qgiv offers industry-leading online giving and peer to peer fundraising tools for nonprofit, faith-based, and political organizations of all sizes.

When she’s not working at Qgiv, Abby can usually be found writing for local magazines, catching up on her favorite blogs, or binge-watching sci-fi shows on Netflix.

 

 

Small Companies Matching Gifts

Companies that Match Donations to High Schools

Across the United States, there are more than 26,000 public high schools and 10,000 private high schools all looking to build on their existing fundraising ideas. At Double the Donation, we work with high schools and education foundations across the country to help them increase the amount of money they receive from corporate matching gift programs.

We know it can sometimes be tricky trying to navigate the complex policies surrounding each company’s matching gift program so we’ve created a number of resources to help organizations better understand employee giving programs. These include:

Since Double the Donation is committed to helping all segments of the nonprofit space optimize their fundraising with matching gift programs, we created this post on matching gift companies that match donations to high schools.

Matching Gifts and High Schools

After higher education, the most common matching gift category is K-12 schools.

Included in this grouping is high schools since many companies do not distinguish between elementary, middle, and high schools when it comes to match eligible organizations. Many of these companies will also match to PTA groups, after school organizations, education foundations. Most matching gift companies do not distinguish between public and private high schools, though specific eligibility does vary by company.

For high schools with a large donor base, whether it’s parents, alumni, or community supporters, be sure to market employee matching gifts as an easy way to double existing donations!

List of Companies with Matching Gift Programs for High Schools

To help schools navigate through the matching gift process we created a short list of companies that will match donations made to K-12 schools and educational programs. This list is by no means exhaustive, so if you aren’t seeing a company here, don’t rule it out just yet. And feel free to check out Double the Donation’s services to learn how we can make the matching gift process even easier.

IBMibm-matching-gifts

IBM is known to many schools for its generosity in donating software and computers to school systems.

An employee can have their donation matched on a 2:1 ratio with IBM products. Or a donation can be matched on a 1:1 basis for cash.

Read more about the IBM matching gift program.

Toys “R” Us

Toys”R”Us, Inc. partners with its team members to support causes that reflect their own personal interests and passions. The list of match eligible approved nonprofits includes to those that keep children safe and help them in times of need; organizations that support the research, treatment, prevention and cure of diseases or disorders that impact families and children; and educational institutions.

That means Toys “R” Us will match donations made by team members to high schools. Through the matching gift program, the company matches donations on a 1:1 basis and will double donations up to $1,000 per employee each year.

Read more about the Toys R Us matching gift program.

Wells Fargowells-fargo-matching

As one of the leading banks, it’s no surprise that many communities have a Wells Fargo presence. Employees of Wells Fargo can have their donations to high schools matched up to $6,500 each year.

Volunteer grants are also available for those who volunteer with educational organizations.

Read more about the Wells Fargo matching gift program.

Starbucksstarbucks-match-gifts

Starbucks Corporation will match up to $1,500 in donations made by an employee each year to high schools and many other organizations. All educational institutions are eligible for the program.

And if you have a volunteer opportunity coming up, be sure to mention it to your local barista since Starbucks also provides grants to organizations where employees volunteer.

Read more about the Starbucks matching gift program and volunteer grants.

Want to know more about corporate giving programs and how they can contribute to your high school’s fundraising efforts?