corporate social responsibility

Top Insights from the New Corporate Social Responsibility Report

The numbers are in! YourCause has recently published their latest corporate social responsibility report that contains data collected from July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015. The 30+ page report covers a multitude of topics ranging from employee engagement both at home and abroad to statistics and trends about employee giving and volunteerism.

Data was collected from over 4 million full-time employees and over 137,000 retirees to look for trends and insights into their engagement in giving and volunteer programs.

Regional sample sizes for U.S.-based engagement ranged from just over 100,00 to over 550,000 for full-time employees and 6,700 to over 43,000 for retirees.

If you don’t have time to go through thirty pages of statistics and data, don’t worry! We’ve compiled the top trends for you!

Here are some of the key insights about corporate social responsibility.

You can find the full report, as well as last year’s findings, over at YourCause.

Retirees donate more than full-time employees.

While full-time employee donations are still impressive, averaging out at $74 per person per year, retirees go above and beyond.

Ten times beyond! Retirees, on average, donate $772 to nonprofit organizations annually.

Retirees also volunteer more than full-time employees.

Full-time employees admittedly have, well, full-time jobs and can’t dedicate as much time to nonprofits as retirees can. But at 16 hours annually per person, employee volunteering is still going strong.

However, retirees, on average, volunteer for 154 hours per year, again, nearly ten times the amount that full-time employees do.

Regional giving in the United States varies.

The North (which, for the purposes of the report is comprised of Minnesota, Michigan, North and South Dakota, Montana, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) sees a 41% rate of employee participation in corporate giving programs.

In contrast, the Midwest (which the report defines as Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Kansas, Missouri, Indiana, and Colorado) only has a 6% rate of employee participation in corporate giving programs.

Interestingly enough, though, the Midwest leads all regions in retiree engagement growth.

The top three states for domestic involvement in employee giving and volunteer programs are Minnesota, Arkansas, and Missouri.

Higher matching gift caps yield higher employee engagement.

Many companies institute maximums on the employee donations that they’ll match.

The report found that:

  • Caps that are set at $1,000 see a 12% employee engagement rate.
  • Caps that are from $1,001 to $10,000 see an 18% engagement rate.
  • Any cap beyond $10,000 sees a spike in employee engagement up to 40%.

Based on this data, it would make sense for companies to offer higher matching gift caps that encourage employees to give to nonprofits more often. Luckily, average match caps are set at just under $9,000 per calendar year.

How employees like to give is different depending on the size of the company.

While the report saw some overlap when it comes to preferred giving methods, many employees like to give in different ways depending on the size of the company they work for:

  • At companies with 1,000 to 5,000 employees, automatic payroll giving is preferred.
  • At companies with 5,001 to 10,000 employees, credit card giving is preferred.
  • At companies with 10,001 to 50,000 employees, offline giving is preferred.
  • At companies with 50,001 to 100,000 employees as well as companies with over 100,000 employees, payroll giving is preferred.

Additionally, employee participation, average donation size, average hours volunteered, and year-over-year donor growth varies depending on the size of the company.

For instance:

  • Companies with 1,000 to 5,000 employees see a 45% participation rate in giving programs; average donation size is $115; average hours volunteered is 41 hours annually; year-over-year donor growth is over 47%.
  • Companies with 5,001 to 10,000 employees see a 34% participation rate in giving programs; average donation size is $112; average hours volunteered is 21 annually; year-over-year donor growth is over 18%.
  • Companies with 10,001 to 50,000 employees see a 26% participation rate in giving programs; average donation size is $215; average hours volunteered is 12 annually; year-over-year donor growth is over 21%.
  • Companies with 50,001 to 100,000 employees see a 56% participation rate in giving programs; average donation size is $245; average hours volunteered is 26 annually; year-over-year donor growth is over 23%.
  • Companies with over 100,000 employees see a 30% participation rate in giving programs; average donation size is $51; average hours volunteers is 15 annually; year-over-year donor growth is -0.49%.

While organization size cannot be considered the sole determinant when it comes to corporate social responsibility, it seems to be a factor in donation size and time spent volunteering.

Employees donate close to home.

The corporate social responsibility report found that half of all employee donations were made to nonprofits within a 14 mile radius of their work addresses.

Additionally, a sizable 80% of all employee donations were made to nonprofits within a 100 mile radius.

It would make sense, therefore, that companies and nonprofits that are in close proximity to one another should form partnerships to better take advantage of the generosity of employees who want to give to their local charitable organizations.

There isn’t a whole lot of difference between campaign giving and year-round giving trends.

Companies that offer year-round giving and volunteering opportunities to employees see an average of $84 donated and 16 hours volunteered per employee.

Companies that focus more on campaign giving had an average of $82 donated and 20 hours volunteered per employee.

Companies offer employees many ways to give.

There is a wide variety of ways for employees to donate to the nonprofits that they care deeply about:

  • 66% of companies support credit card giving.
  • 57% of companies support payroll giving.
  • 72% of companies support offline giving.
  • 3% of companies support PayPal giving.

International giving is also extended to employees at 37% of the companies surveyed. Of that 37%, however, only 14% support international payroll giving.

Given the numerous ways they can give, employees favor payroll deductions the most (56%).

Other relevant and interesting information

  • Many companies encourage employee giving during natural disasters like the Nepal earthquake.
  • The top 1% of charities, in terms of amount donated, received over half of all donated dollars.
  • Nearly 75,000 charities received donations in the span of a year.

While there are many more insights into corporate social responsibility, these highlights can give you a good idea of what the past year of corporate philanthropy looks like. While next year’s report won’t be out for some time, this year’s data is a good indicator of where corporate social responsibility is going.

Click here to access the full report.

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